Congressional committees with members from both the House and the Senate

Congressional committees with members from both the

This preview shows page 13 - 16 out of 68 pages.

 Congressional committees with members from both the House  and the Senate.  Organized to facilitate the flow of legislation.  Bills must pass in identical form in each chamber.  Conference committee    Ad hoc committees, made up of members of both the  Senate and the House, set up to reconcile differences in the provisions of bills.  Created as needed.  Members selected by Speaker and Senate Majority Leader.  Consulting with chairs of committee that originally considered bill.  Sometimes with minority leaders.  Important: Bills reported by them to the House or Senate must be voted up or  down; no new amendments allowed; changes made can be very important.  Committee Chairs and Ranking Members  Seniority   the principle that one attains a position on the basis of length of service.  Chair of the Committee (majority party senior)  Ranking minority member    the highest-ranking member of the minority  party on a congressional committee (minority party senior)   After 1974:  House (after 1974)  secret ballot among party members for election of chairs.  House (today)   majority party leader chooses.  Senate   Seniority  Committee chairs, once protected by seniority, now must be attentive to party  leadership in each house. 
Image of page 13
More power in party leadership in each house.  Protected by seniority before, now must be attentive to party leaders.  Committee chairs   most influential within committees  Power to schedule meetings and organize the staff Influence on committee’s agenda  Influence on appointments to conference committees Deference as most experienced members of committees.  Rules and Norms in the House and Senate  House members   specialist in areas of policy  Reciprocity    Deferral by members of Congress to the judgment of the subject- matter specialist, mainly on minor technical bills. Previously deference to chairs/ranking members, now more to party leaders.  Reciprocity more common in House.  Senators   fewer; more prestige, visibility and power (less reciprocity)  Not unusual for a first term senator to introduce a major bill.  House   large size; more rule-bound: organize & hierarchical  Leaders/majority party in the House have more power.  Individuals have a harder time.  Majority rule  Senate   open and fluid  Less power in leaders  Each senator = independent operator. 
Image of page 14
More attention to members of the minority  Floor debate:  Senate Bills scheduled by  unanimous consent  of a committee    business can be  blocked by a single dissenter. 
Image of page 15
Image of page 16

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture