Notes to the Story of the Conversion 73 Oddason Sturl I 40 49 On fiorgils

Notes to the story of the conversion 73 oddason sturl

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Notes to the Story of the Conversion73Oddason (SturlI 40, 49). On fiorgils himself, see Melabók(ÍFI 153, 162), Msk369–70, SturlI 12–56 and later in this chapter. He was a grandson of Ari Másson(whose sister Valger›r was Ari’s grandmother) and a friend of Sæmundr theLearned, who fostered his son Oddi. fiorgils’s social standing is highlighted bythe story that the reputed son of the Norwegian king Magnús Bareleg, Sigur›rslembidjákn, spent a year with him in Iceland. He died at the monastery offiingeyrar in 1151. fiór›r Gilsson was a descendant of Víga-Sturla and Snorrigo›i, and grandfather of Snorri Sturluson (ÍFI 166; SturlI 52, 64). On fiór›rfiorvaldsson, descendant of Snorri go›i and great-grandson of Ásgeirr Knattarsonin ch. 1, see SturlI 54–5, the genealogies later in this chapter and note 120.114The killing of fiorsteinn Hallvar›sson is included among the important eventsof fiorlákr’s episcopate in Hungrvaka(ÍFXVI 27), and Landnámabók(ÍFI 388)mentions ‘Hallvar›r, father of fiorsteinn, whom Einarr the Shetlander killed’.115The dispute between fiorgils and Hafli›i is also mentioned in Hungrvaka(ÍFXVI 27) during fiorlákr’s episcopate and related at length in fiorgils saga okHafli›ain Sturl I 12–50.11623rd April 1121. There is a fuller description in Jóns saga helga(ÍFXV 238–9).117A ‘six-ell ounce-unit’ was the value of an ounce-unit of homespun, that is,six ells of cloth two ells wide and of stipulated quality (one ell was 49.2 cm). Atthe standard rate, 8 such ounce-units of homespun were equivalent to one weighedounce of silver. A hundred in this context has the duodecimal value of 120, soHafli›i awarded himself 7200 ounce-units in all, that is 900 ounces of silver orthe price of 360 cows. fiorgils saga ok Hafli›a(SturlI 49, 50) puts the price at600 ounces of silver (or 240 cows) and specifies the means of payment as ‘landin the Northern Quarter, gold and silver, goods from the East, ironwork, valuableobjects costing no less than the price of a cow, gelded horses—an ungeldedhorse only if it were accompanied by a mare, and a mare only if accompanied bya stallion, and no horse older than twelve or younger than three years old’. Bothawards are unusually high.118In Skar›sárbók1958: 194, the relevance of Ketill’s appointment as bishopis made clearer by the fuller account of the disagreement between fiorgils andHafli›i and the comment that ‘Ketill managed to bring an end to the differencewith his persuasion’. In fiorgils saga ok Hafli›a(SturlI 47–8), Ketill’s abilitiesas peacemaker are explicitly said to qualify him for the role of bishop.119Hafli›i’s marriage to fiurí›r is mentioned in Landnámabók(ÍFI 182) andSturl I 12; fiurí›r’s father fiór›r, the son of Víga-Sturla was married to the daughterof Snorri go›i. Little is known about Hafli›i’s son fiór›r, fiór›r’s wife Solvƒr ortheir son Ívarr, but the fiorsteinn Ívarsson mentioned in Íslendinga saga(Sturl243) appears to be this Ívarr’s son.120Hafli›i’s marriage to Rannveig is mentioned in Sturl I 12, 54–5, as are thechildren of fiór›r and Sigrí›r, there called Páll, Snorri, Teitr and Ívarr. fiór›r is I

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