Look for worn or failed components on electrical

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Regular, periodic cleaning gives you the chance to inspect all components. Look for worn or failed components. On electrical components, dark areas might indicate a burned out component. Prior to cleaning computer components, power down and unplug components and let them sit for at least 30 minutes to cool. Use caution with liquid-based cleansers. Use small amounts and always apply cleaning solutions to cloths and cleaning instruments, never directly to component surfaces. Dust buildup inside a computer acts as an insulator for internal components, trapping heat and preventing adequate cooling of components. Use: o Compressed air to blow dust off o A non-static vacuum to remove dust o A natural bristle paintbrush to wipe components off Use a small amount of denatured alcohol on a cotton swab to clean electrical connectors (such as those on expansion cards). For LCD screens, use a lint-free dry cloth or a small amount of isopropyl alcohol (do not use window cleaner or ammonium-based cleaners or paper towels). You can also use special monitor-cleaning solutions or pre-packaged wipes with monitor-safe solution. For a mouse with a roller ball, clean the ball and the roller contacts on a regular basis. For keyboards, use a vacuum or compressed air. For keys that stick use a lint-free cloth and/or cleaning swabs, lightly dampened, to gently wipe each key. To clean a printer, use a damp or dry cloth. o On inkjet printers, use the printer's cleaning function to clean the print heads. o For laser printers, use an anti-static vacuum to remove excess toner. A regular vacuum will build up an electrostatic charge from the toner. On removable media devices, use:
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o A DDS-approved cleaning tape, to automatically clean the heads of a tape drive. o Compressed air to blow dust and debris off of CD-ROM and DVD disc surfaces, out of drive bays, and off of drive heads. o Soft lint-free cloths, dry, to wipe smudges off of CD-ROM and DVD disc media surfaces. Be aware of the following additional tips for maintaining your computer: When receiving a new computer or component that has been shipped, let it sit for at least 6 hours (24 hours if it arrives in outside freezing conditions) before applying power. The rapid change in temperature can cause damage to components or can result in condensation within the computer. Perform regular backups. Backups protect your data if a hard disk fails. You can use covers and cases to protect some equipment (such as printers) from dust and liquid spills. Be sure to remove covers before use and replace after use. Keep cables organized. Route cables to prevent them from being kinked or stepped on. For best results, use cable ties to bind and organize cables. Verify that your system's cooling fans are blowing air through the system case in the correct directions. A fan blowing in the wrong direction can negate the airflow through the case and cause the system to overheat.
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