The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 This law was established

The patient safety and quality improvement act of

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The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 This law was established for voluntary and confidential reporting to be used by physicians, hospitals, and other healthcare entities to report medical errors into a confidential database. It allows these medical reporting errors to be prohibited from being used in a civil liability cases, if they are reported voluntarily. Studies have shown that organizations who support error disclosure have a decreased in the number of lawsuits and compensation payouts (Jerrard, 2006). It was passed by the House of Representatives July 27, 2005. The National Medical Error Disclosure and Compensation Act of 2005 This law is an extension of the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act and “promote a culture of safety within hospitals, health systems, clinics, and other sites of healthcare.” It is also known as the MEDiC Act and is used to oversee patient
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safety database and provides funding to healthcare providers with systems to disclose medical error to patients and offer fair compensation to the patients if the provider is at fault. To reduce the amount of money spent in legal costs for malpractice claims, the MEDiC Act requires medical liability insurance companies and providers to apply a percentage of their savings toward the reduction of medical errors. The main goal of this law is to reduce the fear in physicians and healthcare agencies to report medical error. Often times, medical errors are not reported for fear of lawsuits (Jerrard, 2006). The Medication Error Prevention Act of 2000 This law encourages the use of a voluntary reporting system known as Med MARx, an anonymous internet based system for healthcare providers to share experiences regarding medical errors (Schulman and Kim, 2000). All of these laws are used in conjunction with each other to improve patient safety and reduce the number of medical errors that could adversely affect patient safety. Regulatory The Joint Commission The Joint Commission develops standards with the help of medical professionals, subject matter experts, and government agencies to improve patient safety and quality of care. Their standards are used to help measure, asses and improve
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