Alone in the apartment Blanche is visited by a young innocent man who is

Alone in the apartment blanche is visited by a young

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Alone in the apartment, Blanche is visited by a young, innocentman who is collecting for a newspaper. She flirts shamelesslywith him, telling him he looks like "a young Prince out of theArabian Nights." Blanche kisses him on the mouth and thentells him to run along because she "has to be good—and keepmy hands off children." Dumbfounded, the man leaves. Shelooks dreamily after him. Mitch arrives and gives Blanche abouquet of roses. Blanche calls him her "knight of the roses,"coquettishly presses the flowers to her lips, and asks him tobow to her.AnalysisScene 5 opens with Blanche being amused about the way shehas lied in a letter to Shep. However the subject of deceit soonbecomes serious for Blanche when Stanley implies thatBlanche is not as innocent as she tries to appear. Blanche saysher sign is Virgo and explains "Virgo is the Virgin." Stanleylaughs contemptuously, suggesting he knows Blanche is novirgin, an accurate assessment. Blanche becomes nervouswhen Stanley casually mentions a man named Shaw, whoclaims he met Blanche at a sleazy hotel called the Flamingo.Although Blanche denies this story, her frightened reactionconfirms the truth of it. Stanley has begun to peel awayBlanche's lies, making her frantic.The second part of Scene 5 delves deeper into Blanche'sdesires. She has a desperate desire to attract Mitch becauseshe wants to rely on someone who can relieve her of thepressures of life. Blanche says, "I want to rest! I want tobreathe quietly again! Yes—I want Mitch." However Blanchefears she will no longer be able to maintain the illusion of beingyounger than she really is. Blanche views this deception as vitalto attracting Mitch, although there is no proof that herassessment is accurate. Blanche's dependence on men takesthe form of attracting a man who will take care of her. In theSouthern tradition in which Blanche was raised, genteelwomen attract gentlemen and, once married, expect to betaken care of. Blanche tells Stella, "I have to admit I love to bewaited on."Later in the scene a different side of Blanche's desires comesto the forefront in the form of her sexuality. The young,innocent salesman who stops by obviously attracts Blanche.Blanche says, "I've got to be good—and keep my hands offchildren," which implies that she may not have succeeded indoing so in the past. She is a person who feels sexually drawnto young men, perhaps even those who are inappropriatelyyoung, foreshadowing, or hinting what is to come later,information that will come to light in Scene 9.Williams incorporates the symbol of music in this scenethrough the "blue piano." For the author the "blue piano"represents the spirit of the French Quarter in New Orleansbecause it creates a sultry, tragic mood, similar to that of bluesmusic. Because of this Williams has the "blue piano" startplaying when Blanche acts seductively toward the young man.
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