This is not an all or nothing characteristic of an instrument it is a question

This is not an all or nothing characteristic of an

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This is not an all-or-nothing characteristic of an instrument, it is a question of degree (R and V) 9. Can be enhanced by adding more subparts to the scale (R) 44
10. The higher the level of this in an instrument, the lower the amount of error in the obtained scores (R) Unit 11 Activity 3 Trustworthiness of Data The Qualitative Perspective Although quantified reliability and validity coefficients cannot be applied to qualitative data, qualitative researchers are also concerned with the quality of data. Four criteria for establishing trustworthiness of qualitative data are creditability, dependability, confirmability and transferability (Lincoln & Guba, 1985). Read each of the following and mark them C for credibility , D for dependability , CO for confirmability and T for transferability . 1. Refers to confidence in the truth of the data (C) 2. Prolonged engagement and persistent observation may enhance this (C) 3. Refers to data stability over time and over conditions (D) 4. If two or more people agree about the data s relevance or meaning it may have this (CO) 5. Stepwise replication is one approach used to assess this aspect of trustworthiness (D) 6. Refers to the extent to which the findings for the data can be transferred to others (T) 7. Readers make judgments about contextual similarity to help them determine the possibility of this (T) 8. Refers to the objectivity or neutrality of the data (CO) 9. Similar to the quantitative research concept of generalizability (T) 10. Thick descriptions help consumers of research determine this (T) Unit 12: Chapter 15 (14/15)- Interpretation of clinical significance in quantitative research The interpretation of quantitative research results (the outcomes of the statistical analyses) typically involves consideration of 1. The credibility of the results 2. Precision of estimates of effects 3. Magnitude of effects 4. Underlying meaning 5. Generalizability, and 6. Implications for future research and nursing practice The particulars of the study- especially the methodologic decisions made by researchers- affect the inferences that can be made about the correspondence between study results and “truth in the real world” A cautious outlook is appropriate in drawing conclusions about the credibility and meaning of study results An assessment of a studys credibility can involve various approaches, one of which involves an evaluation of the degree of congruence between abstract constructs or idealized methods on the one hand and the proxies actually used on the other Credibility assessments also involve an assessment of study rigor through an analysis of validity threats and biases that could undermine the accuracy of the results Corroboration (replication) of results, through either internal or external sources, is another approach in a credibility assessment 45
Researchers can facilitate interpretations by carefully documenting methodologic decisions and the outcomes of those decisions (e.g., by using CONSORT guidelines to document participant flow).

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