Cemetery on amorgos smaller head thinner neck body as

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cemetery on Amorgos smaller head thinner neck body as series of geometric shapes arms are slightly curved female features are all that receive any emphasis
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Montréal: Musée des Beaux Arts Paros Cycladic Figurine 19.9 cm x 6.8 cm x 2.5 cm Purchase, decorative Arts EC II, c. 3000 BCE – c. 2400 BCE acquisition fund and William Dhokathismata type Gilman Chenny  1960Ca.1 Photo: Kevin Gauley
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Keros-Syros Culture (EC II) Khalandriani type flat angular body parts very geometric proportions distorted
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Keros-Syros (EC II) Culture genitals and gravidation multiple stretch lines = successful pregnancies penis not often depicted pregnant but not extremely
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Baldric-wearing warriors Pancho Villa
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Cyclades: harpist seated feet flat more details of head ears eyes mouth nose hands grab harp chair depicted accurately
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Keros-Syros Culture (early phase, EC II)
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seated on elegant fancy stool thought to be making a toast perhaps audience at concert perhaps lost in conversation perhaps lost in thought  celebrating        Go Ravens!        Poe San Fran!
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What Figurines Represent: -- toys -- representations of ancestors -- substitutes for sacrifice -- representations of the deceased -- fertility figures (females) -- mourners -- chthonic deities offerings (votives) to the dead
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What Figurines Mean: Wide range of types and styles: probably made in different workshops and by different masters Use of standard pattern and set of proportions; length of neck, legs Range of sizes: from 20 cm to nearly 1.5 m. in height meaning of different sizes unknown Made on Cycladic islands but found on mainland Greece and Crete – in great demand Most are found in graves, possibly as companions to the deceased some were broken to fit into the grave servants of the dead (funerary examples) ancestors of the deceased Others are found in domestic contexts (houses) Toys Ritual meanings: stand-ins for human sacrifice heroes, nymphs, deities mother Goddess (female statuettes)
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“Frying Pan” (EC II); from Syros Made of clay, fired in a kiln Incised decoration: spiral designs ship with fish incisions filled in with white paste do NOT show wear Meaning: fertility charm (womb?) mirror (filled with water)
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Grotta-Pelos ceramics: ‘frying pans’ Kampos Group (sub-group) EC I
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Keros-Syros (EC I) Khalandriani frying pan
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EC I frying pans with geometric designs
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Early Cycladic Period: Pottery Kernos (EC III) multiple vase
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  • Winter '13
  • GeorgeHarrison
  • Cyclades, Kea): Temple, Ayia Irini, keros-syros culture

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