The above current values satisfy the kirchhoffs loop

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The above current values satisfy the Kirchhoff’s Loop rule because when plugged into the Kirchhoff equation we get 0.02 ± 0.002 A. 0.0100 + 0.0130 – 0.0030 = 0.02 A Error prop:
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Because the value we get from Kirchhoff’s Circuit Rule is fairly close to 0, I would say that the Kirchhoff’s Loop rule is satisfied. 3. Lastly compare the measured currents to those you first calculated from Kirchhoff’s Circuit Rules. Are they in agreement? Current 1: 0 ± 0.0016 A Current 2: 0 ± 0.0017 A Current 3: 0.4348 ± 0.0016 A The expected t-value to get, in general, would be 1 and looking at the t-values of the measured and calculated currents above, the t-values obtained are smaller than 1 and are all fairly close to 0. This means that the measured and calculated currents are in agreement with each other. Wheatstone Bridge and Unknown Resistance 1. You may be asking yourself “Why use the Wheatstone Bridge to find the resistance if one could simply measure it directly using a multimeter?” This is a good question and warrants consideration of the following: how does a multimeter go about determining resistance; what sort of difficulties might arise when measuring very small resistance values; is the Wheatstone Bridge method more accurate? With these in mind attempt to explain the usefulness of the Wheatstone Bridge. The multimeter measures resistance by making a metal to metal contact with the circuit. When using the multimeter, we have to consider where and how to connect the probes in the circuit therefore placing the probes at different places could change, although little, the resistance value that should be being measured. The value of the unknown resistor that we obtain using the Wheatstone is. R unknown = = 145.9 ± 0.1 Ω To see whether or not this value is acceptable, we need to look at the t-value. The t-value we get is: However, the value of the resistor we get from the multimeter is 146.6 ± 0.1 Ω. We also need to look at the t-value and compare it to the previously obtained t-value in order to decide which of the two is more accurate.
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