reduced rating would be 5 kVA or in direct proportion to the applied voltage 5

Reduced rating would be 5 kva or in direct proportion

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reduced rating would be 5 kVA, or in direct proportion to the applied voltage. 5. Can 60 Hz transformers be operated at 50 Hz? ACME transformers rated below 1 kVA can be used on 50 Hz service. Transformers 1 kVA and larger, rated at 60 Hz, should not be used on 50 Hz service, due to the higher losses and resultant heat rise. Special designs are required for this service. However, any 50 Hz transformer will operate on a 60 Hz service. Transformer Questions & Answers 6. Can transformers be used in parallel? Single phase transformers can be used in parallel only when their impedances and voltages are equal. If unequal voltages are used, a circulating current exists in the closed network between the two transformers, which will cause excess heating and result in a shorter life of the transformer. In addition, impedance values of each transformer must be within 7.5% of each other. For example: Transformer A has an impedance of 4%, transformer B which is to be parallel to A must have an impedance between the limits of 3.7% and 4.3%. When paralleling three phase transformers, the same precautions must be observed as listed above, plus the angular displacement and phasing between the two transformers must be identical. 7. Can Acme Transformers be reverse connected? ACME dry-type distribution transformers can be reverse connected without a loss of kVA rating, but there are certain limitations. Transformers rated 1 kVA and larger single phase, 3 kVA and larger three phase can be reverse connected without any adverse effects or loss in kVA capacity. The reason for this limitation in kVA size is, the turns ratio is the same as the voltage ratio. Example: A transformer with a 480 volt input, 240 volt output— can have the output connected to a 240 volt source and thereby become the primary or input to the transformer, then the original 480 volt primary winding will become the output or 480 volt secondary. On transformers rated below 1 kVA single phase, there is a turns ratio compensation on the low voltage winding. This means the low voltage winding has a greater voltage than the nameplate voltage indicates at no load. For example, a small single phase transformer having a nameplate voltage of 480 volts primary and 240 volts secondary, would actually have a no load voltage of approximately 250 volts, and a full load voltage of 240 volts. If the 240 volt winding were connected to a 240 volt source, then the output voltage would consequently be approximately 460 volts at no load and approximately 442 volts at full load. As the kVA becomes smaller, the compensation is greater— resulting in lower output voltages. When one attempts to use these transformers in reverse, the transformer will not be harmed; however, the output voltage will be lower than is indicated by the nameplate.
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  • Spring '20
  • Electricity distribution, Three-phase electric power, Mains electricity, Single-phase electric power

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