Ii henry david thoreau 1817 1862 civil disobedience

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ii. Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) -- “Civil Disobedience” Has an issue with the government. Responding two big issues: War of Mexico (illegal war) and slavery (abomination). Don’t support government when it is doing something it shouldn’t do. Don’t pay taxes otherwise you support this government. In jail for a night, describes it so horrible. Thoreau demanded to be thrown in jail. Grand standing. Influential piece, most famously on Martin Luther King. First full paragraph of page 153: about the machine. The wrongdoing of the government, injustice will only happen so often before the machine will break down. If not everything will be made smooth. Make sure the solution of the problem won’t be worse than it was before. “But if the injustice
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is such a nature it requires you to contribute to the injustice, break the law!” Be the counter friction break the machine. Stop being a part of the wrong. Encourages nonviolent resistance. Foundational to Gandhi’s approach. International impact. Specifically laws that are required you to be a part of injustice. Based on transcendentalist thought. iii. Walt Whitman [?] (1819-1892) -- Specimen Days He is a poet not a philosopher. First paragraph on page 82, he is left shell shocked after the Civil War. Goes out into nature to clear his mind. Affinities- attraction, closeness (spiritual), commonality. He says there is an affinity we can have with nature. Page 90: Lesson of a tree- Affiliating(similar to affinity) befriending a tree, Problem is there is too much attention of how things seem, compared to what is actually there. Parallel to Emerson. Find out what truly is good. Number of places: something out there with him in nature. Pg 101: Nature is described as a being. Extremely transcendentalist passage. Gets naked a lot. Journal that he is writing.
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