Spread of disinformation and snippets of news that

This preview shows page 8 - 11 out of 27 pages.

spread of disinformation and snippets of news that will attempt to grab the attention of the majority of people. I agree, it is morally wrong for a person to get accused without presenting their side of the story and ignoring any pertinent evidence that could even hint at their innocence. I got a little off topic but it is important as relates to the topic of discussion. o Ekangaki Ahikiriza Ekangaki Ahikiriza YesterdayLocal: Jan 27 at 12:04pm<br>Course: Jan 27 at 11:04am
Manage Discussion Entry Hi Stephanie and class, As we are all aware by now, a fallacy is basically a "fake" piece of information that does not generally carry any logical reasoning. In my view, if the person investigation a particular case is very careful, this should be discovered easily along the way. The only biggest problem is when the person being accused is not given a fair hearing, in which case they would present their side of the story. Fallacies, if properly followed up will lead to an invalid conclusion and will not add up in a logical sense. In the case of the media, as you mentioned on your post, it is true that all sorts of information including hear say could get its into the news. However, in order to ascertain the truth about the issues being mentioned, further and credible investigations needs to be carried out. Ekangaki Ahikiriza Ekangaki Ahikiriza WednesdayLocal: Jan 23 at 10:22pm<br>Course: Jan 23 at 9:22pm Manage Discussion Entry Hello class, Fallacies are mistakes of reasoning, as opposed to making mistakes that are of a factual nature. If I counted twenty people in the room when there were in fact twenty- one, then I made a factual mistake. On the other hand, if I believe that there are round squares, I am believing something that is inconsistent. This is a mistake of reasoning, and a fallacy, since I should not have believed something inconsistent if my reasoning is good. Collapse Subdiscussion Erica Chavez Erica Chavez WednesdayLocal: Jan 23 at 11:39pm<br>Course: Jan 23 at 10:39pm Manage Discussion Entry The bandwagon approach was very popular when I was growing up in order to get people to smoke cigarettes. The “cool camel joe” was advertised in a way that depicted smoking cigarettes was a cool thing and you should be smoking cigarettes too. The result of this cartoon like “cool camel joe” was attracting children to try smoking cigaretted because they thought it was cool. Then it was proven how many toxins were in cigarettes and how it can kill you. I haven’t seen the bandwagon approach used in anything recently. Maybe its because people have gotten smarter about everything and don’t care about being part of the bandwagon anymore. o
Collapse Subdiscussion Kyle Davis Kyle Davis ThursdayLocal: Jan 24 at 9:56am<br>Course: Jan 24 at 8:56am Manage Discussion Entry Erica, That is spot on with how popular the bandwagon approach was just a few years ago.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture