Credit manager 59 solutions manual to accompany dunn

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Credit Manager 59 Solutions Manual to accompany Dunn, Enterprise Information Systems: A Pattern Based Approach, 3e
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Task Level Modeling A5.Motor Building Industry (MBI) Incorporated develops and manufactures natural-gas powered motors. Capital tools are the larger, more-prominent assets of the organization. Because of their long life and significant value, considerable attention is devoted to their acquisition and use. The following procedures are used in acquiring capital tools for MBI Inc. A capital tool is defined as any individual item that costs over $10,000. Capital tools must be requested by a department manager and reviewed and approved by the capital tool planning committee. The department manager prepares a purchase request and a copy (which is filed numerically) and sends the original copy to the planning committee. The planning committee reviews all purchase requests and decides whether to approve the tool request. The committee remits disapproved purchase requests to the requesting manager and forwards approved purchase requests to MBI's purchasing department. Approved capital tools are purchased by the purchasing department manager. Using the approved purchase request, a purchasing agent prepares a purchase order and a copy for each order. The original is filed numerically and the copy is sent to MBI's receiving department. Each tool is assigned to only one purchasing agent, and the assignment is made according to the vendor from whom the tool is intended to be purchased. Several vendors are assigned to each purchasing agent to establish a personal relationship with the vendor and secure a more favorable price because of their knowledge of the vendor. Receiving clerks at the dock receive the tools, inspect them, match the tool to a purchase order, complete a receiving report, and route the tool to the department that originally requested it. Receiving clerks send the receiving report to the treasury department and file a copy alphabetically. Purchase orders are filed numerically. Occasionally, tools are received that were never ordered. Even though the number of these items is relatively small, sorting them out and returning them occupies a major portion of the receiving clerk's time. The treasury department is informed of capital tools received by the receiving report. They pay vendors monthly for the items invoiced by the vendor during the month. An elaborate matching process is required to verify that the price paid is the same as the price negotiated by the purchasing agent. Required: a. Prepare a context diagram for the system. b. Prepare individual data flow diagrams to represent each of the following: record purchase, maintain buyers, and prepare approved but not yet purchased report. You can omit process numbers for this exercise. c. Prepare a flowchart of MBI's tool acquisition process (excluding the payment process). Solutions Manual to accompany Dunn, Enterprise Information Systems: A Pattern Based Approach, 3e 60
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Chapter 5 a. MBI Context Diagram Acquisition/Payment Process Planning Committee Requesting Department Managers Treasury Department MBI Management Receiving Department Vendor Purchasing Department Purchase Request Denied Purchase Request Check Invoice (Bill)
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