The species of hickory was found to be the most

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abundance. The species of Hickory was found to be the most abundant of the adult species with a percent relative abundance quantity of 0.8. Figure 3: This shows the relative abundance of the five most abundant plant species contained within the Tryon-Webber woods. The above plant species were those of saplings. Sapling plants were classified based upon the criteria that their height was within the range of 2 cm to 10 cm. Each plant was found within a 100 m transect, which was then consequently broken into 10 m by 10 m plots. Figure 4: The relative abundance of sapling plant species within the Tryon-Weber woods field site. The five most overall abundant plant species were quantified within a 100 m transect, which was then consequently broken into 10 m by 10 m plots. The recorded number of sapling species within Tryon-Weber was then divided by the total number of both adult and sapling plant species that resided within the corresponding plot in order to obtain the percent relative abundance. The species of Hickory was found to be the least abundant of the sapling species with a percent relative abundance quantity of 0.2. Table 1: This shows the calculated ISI, degrees of freedom, probability, and critical values for the type of individual being that of an adult or a sapling. As seen there is no significant difference between the individuals of adults and saplings.
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Type of Individual ISI Degrees of Freedom Probability Critical Value Adult 2.01 40 0.206 1.28 Sapling 2.29 40 0.206 1.28 References: Long, ZT, TH Pendergast and WP Carson. 2007. “The Impact of Deer on Relationships Between Tree Growth and Mortality in an Old-Growth Beech –Maple Forest.” Forest Ecology and Management. 252:230-238. Schumacher, H.B. and W.P. Carson. In Revision. “Diversity Loss and Biotic Homogenization in 19 Late-Successional and Old-Growth Forest Stands in Pennsylvania.” Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society.
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