Why questions verse simple yes or no when asked why

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why questions verse simple yes or no when asked why they must answer by using their prior knowledge by explaining the facts. “Through exposure to texts with multiple perspectives, and with activities and questions related to their knowledge and learning, students better understand their epistemic beliefs and become more critical readers” (Afflerbach et. al., 2013, p. 445). Any student that lacks prior knowledge will have difficulties with the reading comprehension of a given text. When it comes to reading comprehension, students must be engaged while making connections to the reading. When making connections, students can ask
10 questions and use a model to organize their answers. Gaby will benefit from these strategies as she has many thoughts and understands to highlight important parts when reading but using a graphic organizer will help her comprehend better. It is important that she can make sense of the reading by understanding the purpose of an organizational tool. Questioning will benefit Gaby’s reading comprehension skills by keeping her engaged and active with the given text. It can also benefit her vocabulary abilities as she uses questioning to decode the given sentences. According to Hiebert and Pearson (2012), “teacher read-aloud of high-quality literature has multiple benefits— engaging students in texts, exposing them to rich vocabulary, and giving them access to high-level insights and ideas they might not have been able to comprehend on their own” (p. 51). Incorporating read alouds can also benefit students reading comprehension skills. Teachers should make time to read, engage in, ask questions, and model different reading comprehension strategies. Many students within our classroom will vary from using multiple strategies, so you must know your students to improve their personal comprehension growth. Within my classroom, I would incorporate small group rotations to monitor students' reading comprehension during my reading segment. Each rotation would focus on a different comprehension strategy until I knew that my students were strong. Lastly, as teachers teach reading comprehension, there are four important areas to think about: planning, acting, reflecting, and evaluating (Tun Zaw Oo & Habók, 2020). These steps will ensure that you will have a complete understanding of the given text before introducing it to your students.
11 Selecting Texts Being that I work in the inclusion classroom at my school, I understand the importance of differentiation to meet each student's needs. I teach only Mathematics, but this plays a huge role in English Language Arts and Reading. The student I have been working with is placed in the small group reading class, so the teacher has many different texts for students' groups. According to Burke (n.d), “when selecting a text, you need to consider the three components of text complexity: Qualitative measures, Quantitative measures, and the Reader and the Task. Each of these is equally important when considering the complexity of a text" (p. 3). Qualitative focus on the vocabulary and text structure. Quantitative focuses on the readability level for the student.

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