His sense of longing for his partner is clearly depicted via the enjambment

His sense of longing for his partner is clearly

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His sense of longing for his partner is clearly depicted via the enjambment used between stanzas three and four, perhaps to prolong the memory of his wife.In contrast in “All Legendary Obstacles” it is unknown whether the relationship is based on fact or fiction. The four-six lined stanzas tell of the narrator waiting for the arrival of his lover. However there do seem to be some flaws in this relationship as the full stops between each stanza not only break the continuity of the poem, but also makes the relationship seem disjointed. Throughout Montague’s poem the tone is quite pessimistic and nervous as he awaitsand it causes the reader to wonder whether Montague really wants to overcome the “obstacles” in order to see hispartner? Whereas in “The Skunk” the tone is very romantic, sensual and even slightly humorous at the end. Heaney presents love much more lightheartedly than Montague.This is conveyed immediately in Heaney’s poem by the opening word, “up” and he uses a simile to liken the skunk’s tail to “the chausible/At a funeral Mass.” It is clear to the reader that Heaney doesn’t mean the skunk to be an ugly comparison for his wife, instead he intends it to be “glamorous.” In the first twostanzasthere is a sense of excitement andanticipation as the poet “expect[s] [the skunk] like a visitor.” This is continued in stanza two as the use of short sentences heightens the sense of excitement and speeds up the pace of the poem.In contrast there is no such excitement at the prospect of the imminent arrival of a loved one in “All Legendary Obstacles.” Montague uses three quite bleak example of all that “[lies] between” the twopeople to create a pessimistic tone. There is a “long, imaginary plain”; which is in fact not imaginary but a reality, “the monstrous ruck of mountains”; which creates a sense of foreboding, and sibilance and onomatopoeia are used to describe “the hissing drift of winter rain” which seems very ominous. This is also an example of pathetic fallacy as the dreary landscape may be a parallel for how he himself is feeling.However, the setting in “The Skunk” is quite exotic; “small oranges loomed in the orange tree” making the skunk seeimplying that the skunk is, like Heaney’s wife, very extraordinary and 12
precious. This is reinforced by the simile in line eleven as the word wife is compared to a “stored cask” and is clearly of great importance to the poet.In “All Legendary Obstacles” Montague uses long vowel sounds in the line; “All day I waited” to prolong the time which the two character spend apart. It is not until stanza three that the mysterious visitor finally arrives, “at midnight.” The use of time here makes the partner’s arrival seem quite suspicions and we are told the speaker himself is too “blind with rain/and doubt to speak.” The lovers hands are described as being “chilled” and this could be a metaphor for the “chilly” relationship.

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