24 Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play It builds

24 complication an intensification of the conflict in

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24. Complication: An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. It builds up, accumulates, and develops the central conflict in a literary work. 25. Conceit: A far-fetched simile or metaphor, a literary conceit occurs when the speaker compares two highly dissimilar things. 26.Concrete Poetry: A poem that visually resembles something found in the physical world. 27. Conflict: A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. 28. Connotation: The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. 29. Consonance: The repetition of consonant sounds with differing vowel sounds in words near each other in a line or lines of poetry. 30. Convention: A customary feature of a literary work, such as the use of a chorus in a Greek tragedy, the inclusion of an explicit moral in a fable, or the use of a particular rhyme scheme in a villanelle. 31. Couplet: A pair of rhymed lines that may or may not constitute a separate stanza in a poem. 32. Dactyl: A stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones (blueberry). 33. Denotation: The dictionary meaning of a word. 34. Denouement: The resolution of the plot of a literary work. 35. Deus ex machina: A God who resolves the entanglements of a play through supernatural intervention. 36. Dialogue: The conversation of characters in a literary work. 37. Diction: The selection of words in a literary work. 38. Didactic Literature: Literature designed explicitly to instruct 39. Dramatic Monologue: A type of poem in which the speaker addresses a silent listener. 40. Dramatis personae: Latin for the characters or persons in a play. 41. Elegy: A lyric poem that laments the dead.
42. Elision: The removal of an unstressed vowel or syllable to preserve the meter of a line of poetry. 43. Enjambment: A run-on line of poetry in which logical and grammatical sense carries over from one line intot he next. 44. Epic: A long narrative poem that records the adventures of a hero. They typically chronicle the oroigins of a civilization and embody its central values. 45. Epigram: A brief, witty poem, often satirical. 46. Epigraph: A brief quotation which appears at the beginning of a literary work 47.Epithet: In literature, a word of phrase preceding or following a name which serves to describe the character. 48. Exposition: The first stage of fictional or dramatic plot, in which necessary background information is given. 49. Euphemism: A mild word of phrase which substitutes for another which would be undesirable because it is too direct, unpleasant, or offensive. 50. Fable: A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. They typically include animals as characters. 51. Falling Action: The action following the climax of the work that moves it toward its denouement or its resolution.

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