Then it warms the gas in the convective zone of the Sun and that hot gas

Then it warms the gas in the convective zone of the

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 2 pages.

Then it warms the gas in the convective zone of the Sun and that hot gas bubbles up to the photosphere, producing granules°Thermal RadiationHot objects naturally give off light (more intensity)The color of that light depends on the temperature of the object (hotter=shorter wavelength of max output)The Sun and other stars light comes from this thermal radiation (r>white>b = cooler>hotter)Sun acts like blackbody object°NeutrinosThe fusion in the Sun’s core produces neutrinosNeutrinos are VERY hard to detect, but we have telescopes that can detect a fewThrough neutrino observations, we can take a direct image of the core of the Sun!Part 21:What is solar activity?Periodic disruptions in the Sun’s surface and atmosphere Sunspots: cooler regions of the Sun’s surface, lots of E, due to “kinks” in magnetic field (cuz spin diff)Flares: violent explosions in the Sun's atmosphere above sunspotsProminences: loops of gas trapped above sunspots
Image of page 1
Coronal Mass Ejections: huge bubbles of gas ejected from the Sun, can be dangerous to Earth (bo, sat)All are related to magnetic fields °How does solar activity vary with time?Activity rises and falls with an 11-year period (spots)Solar max/min during that time°What causes solar activity?Stretching and twisting of magnetic field lines near the Sun’s surface causes solar activity°How does solar activity affect humans?Bursts of charged particles from the Sun can disrupt communications, satellites, and electrical power generationPart 22:°How do we measure stellar distances?Parallax tells distances to the nearest stars (big P=close)Compare position of object to background twice/1yr°How do we measure stellar luminosities? M=xLsun  Lum=M3.5If we measure a star’s apparent brightness and distance, we can compute its luminosity with the inverse square law for light; distance double> bright v by 4°How do we measure stellar masses?Newton’s version of Kepler’s third law tells us the total mass of a binary system, if we can measure the orbital period in yrs (p) and average orbital separation of the system (a) P2a3/M1+M2            M1/M2=r2/r1Part 23:°What are the three basic types of spectra? (fingeprints)Continuous spectrum (all)high density hot matter, emission line spectrum (lines) from hot gas, absorption line spectrum (missing lines) light through cold gas°How does the Sun’s spectrum tell us about its composition?Each element has a unique spectrum line “fingerprint”
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read both pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture