07072007000100016 Gunther M 2016 Theories and frameworks for professional

07072007000100016 gunther m 2016 theories and

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07072007000100016. Gunther, M. (2016). Theories and frameworks for professional nursing practice. In E. E. Friberg & J. L. Creasia (Eds.), Conceptual foundations: The bridge to professional nursing practice (6th ed.). [Vitalbook version]. Retrieved from Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 17, 2015 05:58 PM 0 Like Substantive Post Terrie Spivey 4 posts Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 Thanks for sharing that experience. We all have had that difficult patient that no matter how much you teach or educate they keep coming back to the ED or being admitted as a patient. Sometimes, I do think like in this example that even though that was harsh it sometimes is necessary. As nurses we all get frustrated with different situations. We try to paint a picture of the disease or what will happen if you continue down this path, but ultimately it is up to the patient to make that change. Self-efficacy is important especially in this case. This person has to believe that they are capable to make this change. Is there any follow up with the patient after they are given the center for rehabilitation? Is education or material given just to the patient or is the family included?
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Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 17, 2015 11:39 PM 0 Like Oscar Robleto 7 posts Re:Re:Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 Professor Whitney, it is sad to see the increase number of patients admitted to the ICU diagnosed with cirrhosis in early 30's in the last 10 years, some of them even make a trip back to the hospital every other week. It's even more alarming to see parents and kids with the same issues. Another sad case I've witnessed was the death of a young lady in her early 40's. Comatose, liver severely damaged secondary to alcoholic cirrhosis. Awaiting for family member to arrive prior to withdrawing care, mother showed up later in the evening with alcohol smell. It is a very difficult approach in how we nurses can make an impact on this problem. People are aware how lethal alcohol and other substances are to our health but don't seem to care. I personally see this type of patients as human beings in need of help and put any type of judgment aside. Reply | Quote & Reply | Report Abuse Oct 18, 2015 12:45 AM 0 Like Oscar Robleto 7 posts Re:Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 Professor Whitney. It is difficult to understand and figure out patient's thoughts and layers entirely, part of the reason because our assignments are subject to change on the daily basis and unfortunately we are not able to maintain continuity of care, staffing issues to be precise. It is important for nurses to be good listeners to our patients, open to hear their topics of interest and gradually deviate the subject to educate them according to their specific needs, make them feel important by reflecting our human kindness rather than clients or subjects to treat.
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