An NG tube is used to decompress the remaining portion of the stomach Observe

An ng tube is used to decompress the remaining

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: An NG tube is used to decompress the remaining portion of the stomach Observe the gastric aspirate for color, amount, & odor o Aspirate is usually bright red at first, with a gradual darkening within the first 24 hours after surgery o Normally the color changes to yellow-green within 36-48 hours Observe the patient for signs of decreased peristalsis, including abdominal distention & lower abdominal discomfort, which may indicate intestinal obstruction o Monitor & record accurate intake & output every 4 hours Keep patients comfortable & free of pain by giving analgesics & frequently changing position; splinting incision areas with a pillow while encouraging the patient to deep breathe helps prevent pulmonary complications Observe the dressings for signs of bleeding or odor & drainage indicative of an infection o Encourage early ambulation Administer potassium & vitamin supplements as ordered until oral feedings are resumed; when fluids are well tolerated, the NG tube is removed Pernicious anemia is a long-term complication of total gastrectomy & may occur after partial gastrectomy; due to the loss of intrinsic factor o Patients will require cobalamin replacement therapy Diagnostic Studies/Lab Tests (Upper GI/Obesity) : Diagnostic Studies (GERD) : GERD is usually diagnosed based on symptoms Endoscopy is useful in assessing the LES competence & degree of inflammation, potential scarring, & strictures Diagnostic Studies (Hiatal Hernia) : An esophagram (barium swallow) may show the protrusion of gastric mucosa through the esophageal hiatus Diagnostic Studies (Esophageal Cancer) : Endoscopic biopsy is necessary to make a definitive diagnosis Module 12 – Disorders in the Lower Gastrointestinal System :
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Nursing Care & Management (Inflammatory Disorders) : Nursing Management – Appendicitis : Focuses on preventing fluid volume deficit, relieving pain, & preventing complications Patients should be kept NPO until the HCP evaluates the patient Administer IV fluids, analgesics, & antiemetics as ordered Patients are usually discharged within 24 hours Ambulation begins a few hours after surgery & the diet is advanced as tolerated Most patients resume normal activities 2-3 weeks after surgery Nursing Management – Peritonitis : Establish IV access so you can administer replacement fluids lost to the peritoneal cavity & have access for antibiotic therapy May position the patient with knees flexed to increase comfort Administer antiemetics to decrease nausea & vomiting Place the patient on NPO status Administer low flow oxygen therapy as needed Nursing Management – Inflammatory Bowel Disease : Assess for presence of blood in stools & emesis; administer IV fluids, electrolytes, analgesics, anti-inflammatory medications as ordered Monitor serum electrolytes, CBC, & vital signs Until diarrhea is controlled, help the patient stay clean, dry, & free of odor o Place a deodorizer in the room o Meticulous perianal skin care using plain water (no harsh soap) together with a moisturizing skin barrier cream prevents skin breakdown o
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