Advantages and Disadvantages of the Federal System Advantages 1 The federal

Advantages and disadvantages of the federal system

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Advantages and Disadvantages of the Federal System:Advantages:1.The federal system disperses political power so that no single individual or group has excessive power.2.A federal system of government provides a good training ground for our national leader. They gain experience in the lower level of governments before being entrusted with leading the national government; president.3.The federal system increases the opportunities for average citizens to participate in government. There are over 87,000 governments on the national, state, county, city, etc. levels. There are more that one million office holders. The most successful democracies are ones in which citizens can get involved, or at least feel they can get involved.4.The federal system makes government more manageable. It decentralizes the management of government in the United States.Disadvantages:1.The federal system makes decision making more complex and difficult because two decisions have to be made in respect to every policy decision: what policy should be pursued; and who should perform this policy? The national government, state government, or a combination of the two? National decisions vs. state decisions.2.The federal system promotes inequalities among citizens. Where one lives, how they are raised and by whom, etc. reflects differently on equality.Old Federalism: Competition and conflicts between the national government and that state government over questions of which part of the government was to do which things. Competition over defining the proper role for each.Constitution: “Powers”oNational Powers: 1.Delegated Powers. Specific powers determined by the constitution. (Article 1, Section 8)2.Implied Powers. Powers implied from the delegated powers. (McCulloch vs. Maryland 1819. Bank Set-Up)oState Powers:1.Reserved Powers, not delegated in the constitution. (10thAmendment)2.Supremacy Clause (Article 6)
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ConstitutionNational GovernmentTreaties by National GovernmentState LawsNew Federalism: Cooperation1.Federal Grants-in-AidGovernment grants money to states for specific, worthy projects. (Highways, hospitals, etc.) Often, there are strings attached with using national government money.Morrill Act (1863): Provided for the establishment of land grant institutions, institutions of higher learning. Allowed ordinary citizens to go to college, not just the wealthy. Made access to higher education available to the masses. 2.Revenue sharing (1972-1987). National government collects money through taxes and gives it to state localities to use as they please with no strings attached. Debt of the national government was rising, so stopped revenue sharing. 3.State to State Cooperation:Full faith in credit: must recognize official acts of other states. (Drivers license, etc. Exception is criminal law.)Privileges immunities: own land in WV, same privilege extended to out of state citizens. (In-state, out of state tuition.)Extradition: criminal law. Prisoners returned to state escaped from.
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