demands of Americans that they lucidly grasp the necessity for an economy such

Demands of americans that they lucidly grasp the

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demands of Americans that they lucidly grasp the necessity, for an economy such as theirs, of having a margin of profitless operations . An immense industrial network cannot be managed in the same way that one changes a tire .... It expresses a circuit of cosmic energy on which it depends, which it cannot limit, and whose laws it cannot ignore without consequences. Woe to those who, to the very end, insist on regulating the movement that exceeds them with the narrow mind of the mechanic who changes a tire.
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At: utility focus / work Their obsession with utility creates a dialectical schema which sublimates the “unproductive” realm of the sacred under the contours of profane civility. This telos of productivity only internalizes mortal anxiety. Biles 2011 (Jeremy Biles – PhD from the University of Chicago Divinity School, "The Remains of God: Bataille/Sacrifice/Community", Culture, Theory and Critique, 2011, 52(2–3), 127–144 – ERW) All such expenditures – useless, diverted from any utilitarian ends – obviously ‘ go against judgments that form the basis of a rational economy’ (Bataille 1991: 22). Indeed, the imperative to waste and the related glorious modes of expenditure that fascinate Bataille are inimical to the calculations that define a restricted economy based on the tenets of limited resources and concern for securing future interests. But it is this consideration of the future, of advantageous utility, that deprives humans of sovereignty. Sovereignty, by Bataille’s account, is linked with experience of the sacred, and refers to escape from the realm of work, subjugation to labour, calculation, and instrumental reason – in short, the realm of the profane. Following Emile Durkheim, Bataille posits a radical heterogeneity between the sacred and the profane, while also dividing the sacred between what subsequent scholars have called the right sacred – the powers of order, power, purity, eternity, and life – and the left sacred, aligned with the dangerous forces of corrosion, decay, impurity, time, and death (see Durkheim 1965: 455–6). Bataille argues that the divide between the sacred and the profane arises in conjunction with the advent of labour. He relates labour to the establishment of the subject/object dichotomy in human consciousness, suggesting that ‘the positing of the object [or the “thing”], which is not given in animality, occurs in the human use of tools’ (Bataille 1992a: 27). Subordinated to the one who uses it, a tool is assigned a utility, a telos beyond its immediate existence, and thus takes its place within a newly emergent sphere of ‘discontinuous’ objects that now includes oneself and others. ‘With work’, Michel Surya has written, ‘mankind discovered ends ... . And all ends are a calculation speculating on the benefits of the future, ... all ends separate humanity from itself’ (2002: 383). With the rise of self-consciousness , of oneself as a separate, distinct individual, also comes the fear of death and the corresponding desire for durable, even eternal, existence. Subjugated to mortal anxiety ,
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