Studies show that humans have a bias where we respond and remember people of

Studies show that humans have a bias where we respond

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Studies show that humans have a bias where we respond and remember people of our own race accurately than faces of different ethnicities. This is proved to be true also in people of similar ages. This is also a cognitive bias found in young Aleuts more frequently than with older participants. This allows insight to what is a person's social “in” or “out” group. It would also be fair to say interviewers are more likely to respond to and hire a person who they remember more which will often resemble them in some form if they do not pay attention to their cognitive biases. When both old and young groups respond more to their own age, it could become more understandable my there is an original bias present, it does not excuse the fact, but provides an explanation. (Wiese, Holger, et) Younger employees are also being discriminated against. Arguably one of the more generalized groups by older generations, millennials are increasing being titled as lazy, unreliable, and unprofessional. Diversity is a integral part of the work place environment and Age is an important key to diversity. Age allows younger employees to learn from older employees, and older employees to gain a younger more positive outlook on life. Diversity in crucial to a productive and moderate workplace and a wide range of ages allow for growth between both ends of the age spectrum and in between. (Garver) Gender & Sexual Identification (Mushie)
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Social scientists define “sex” and “gender” as, “...when in reference to a person “sex” is defined as a person’s biological or anatomical identity and “gender” is defined as a collection of characteristics that are culturally associated with maleness or femaleness.” With that being said, discrimination can be found in both men and women. However, in much of the written literature from the ancient and medieval world, there is clear evidence of women’s oppression by men. Women were under the control of their fathers and husbands down to job status or even the required approval of the husband in order to be eligible to work. Sex related discrimination found in the workplace may be direct or indirect. It is w hen an employee is treated unfavorably because of their sex or if employers or managers hold assumptions about what sort of work women and men are capable, or not capable, of doing. Women have reported stereotyping in the workforce as well. Reports show that females have often been stereotyped based off the clothing they wore, as if wearing pants was not a “norm” or perceived “too manly.” Some may also call this a type of sexual harassment which is known as any unwanted, physical or verbal, acts that are sexual or obscene. Statistics indicate that one in four women experience sexual harassment in the workplace, while almost ten in three cases before the EEOC are sex discrimination. In the fiscal year 2016, the number of sex discrimination charges was 26,934, representing 29.4 percent of total charges. Not only does the right to break away from discrimination require the obligation to
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  • Fall '07
  • CATES
  • Discrimination, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

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