According to the W3C section is a much broader element while the article

According to the w3c section is a much broader

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, According to the W3C, <section> is a much broader element, while the <article> element is to be used for blocks of content that could potentially be read or consumed independently of the other content on the page.
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18 Sections versus DIVs , The WHATWG specification warns readers that the <section> element is not a generic container element. HTML already has the <div> element for such uses. , When an element is needed only for styling purposes or as a convenience for scripting, it makes sense to use the <div> element instead. , Another way to help you decide whether or not to use the <section> element is to ask yourself if it is appropriate for the element's contents to be listed explicitly in the document's outline. , If so, then use a <section>; otherwise use a <div>. Figure and Figure Captions , The W3C Recommendation indicates that the <figure> element can be used not just for images but for any type of essential content that could be moved to a different location in the page or document and the rest of the document would still make sense. Figure and Figure Captions , The <figure> element should not be used to wrap every image. , For instance, it makes no sense to wrap the site logo or non-essential images such as banner ads and graphical embellishments within <figure> elements. , Instead, only use the <figure> element for circumstances where the image (or other content) has a caption and where the figure is essential to the content but its position on the page is relatively unimportant. Figure and Figure Captions
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19 Aside , The <aside> element is similar to the <figure> element in that it is used for marking up content that is separate from the main content on the page. , But while the <figure> element was used to indicate important information whose location on the page is somewhat unimportant, the <aside> element “represents a section of a page that consists of content that is tangentially related to the content around the aside element.” , The <aside> element could thus be used for sidebars, pull quotes, groups of advertising images, or any other grouping of non-essential elements. HTML 5.1 , Quest to define new HTML elements continues , Often standardize common ways in which content authors combine existing markup with JavaScript <summary> and <detail> <dialog> <menu> and <menuitem> , Support by browsers at best partial Challenge for content authors
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