Marc Rothko Blue Orange Flat or not Flat Flat not really any depth The

Marc rothko blue orange flat or not flat flat not

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Marc Rothko, Blue, Orange. Flat or not Flat? Flat, not really any depth. The strategies to create a sense of depth and the illusion of space: Overlapping, position, size, point perspective, alternating value and texture, Changing brightness and color. Overlapping, position and size Rupert Garcia, 1. Overlap If one shape overlaps another, the shape in front seems to be closer.
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2. Vertical Placement: a shape lower in the picture plane appears to be closer. 3. Diminishing Size: The size of one shape compared to another often suggests that the larger object is closer to us. Point Perspective: Perspective: Artists, architects, and designers who wish to suggest the illusion of depth on a two- dimensional surface use perspective. Two types of perspective are linear and isometric. Linear perspective relies on a system where lines appear to converge at points in space. Isometric perspective uses parallels to communicate depth. Multi- Point Perspective: If we are looking at an object from a position other than ground level, then we need points away from the horizon line and other variations on perspective. Many objects are made up of multiple angles that need even more vanishing point. The most common multiple-point perspective system is three-point perspective. A vanishing point is places above or below the horizon line to accommodate a high or low angle of observation. Worm’s-eye view: looking up Bird’s-eye view: looking down. Isometric perspective: Arranges parallel lines diagonally in a work to give a sense of depth. Derives from the Greek meaning “equal measure”. It was particularly suitable for painting on scrolls, which can be examined only in sections. Atmospheric Perspective: Distant objects lack contrast, detail, and sharpness of focus because the air that surrounds us is not completely transparent. TIME AND MOTION Surrealism Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory, 1904. 10-11-18 Principles of Organization:
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Unity and Variety, Emphasis and subordination. Balance. Repetition and Rhythm. Scale and Proportion. Unity: Provides an artwork with its cohesiveness and helps communicate its visual idea. An appearance of oneness or wholeness. Artists are concerned with three kinds of unity: Compositional. Conceptual. Gestalt- a combination of compositional and conceptual working together. A total composition used in combination with variety. Compositional Unity: An artist creates compositional unity by organizing all the visual aspects of a work. Too much similarity of shape, color, lines, or any single element of principle of art= monotonous and/or make us lose interest. Too much variety can lead to a lack of structure and the absence of a central idea. Conceptual Unity: Conceptual unity refers to the cohesive expression of ideas within a work of art. The expression of ideas may not look organized, but an artist can still communicate them effectively by selecting images that conjure up a single notion. Artists bring their own intentions, experiences, and reactions to their work. These ideas—conscious and unconscious—can also contribute to the conceptual unity of a work.
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  • Spring '14
  • CharlesJ.Brown
  • Art, Notes, Jeff

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