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Relapsing remitting ms rrms most common type

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disease, affecting approximately 5% of patients. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS : most common type, affecting 85% of patients. It is characterized by clearly defined attacks of new or increasing neurologic symptoms. These attacks, also called relapses or exacerbations are followed by periods of partial or complete recovery (remissions). It can be classified as active vs. non-active or worsening vs. non-worsening.
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Primary Progressive MS (PPMS) : is relatively rare, and affects approximately 10% of patients. is characterized by steady decline and worsening neurologic function from the onset of symptoms, without early relapses or remissions. Secondary Progressive MS (SPMS) : 50% of patients with RRMS commonly developed secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) after 10–15 years. This disease course is steadily progressive and can manifest with or without clear-cut relapses. Treatment and Management of MS There is no cure for multiple sclerosis. Treatment typically focuses on speeding recovery from attacks, slowing the progression of the disease and managing MS symptoms. Some people have such mild symptoms that no treatment is necessary. The available disease-modifying therapies(DMTs) used to treat MS are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat relapsing forms of MS, which include RRMS as well as progressive MS in those individuals who continue to experience relapses. Currently, there is no treatment that have been approved to treat PPMS without relapses (NMSS, 2017). For acute relapses (MS Attacks), the following treatment may be prescribed: Corticosteroids : such as oral prednisone and intravenous methylprednisolone, are prescribed to reduce nerve inflammation. Side effects may include insomnia, increased blood pressure, mood swings and fluid retention. Plasmapheresis : may be used if your symptoms are new, severe and haven't responded to steroids. Treatments geared towards modifying progression of MS include: For PPMS : ocrelizumab is the only FDA-approved disease-modifying therapy. It slows worsening of disability in people with this type of MS. For RRMS : these drugs are currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of RRMS, and they include: o Interferon- β : comes in two forms - interferon -1a or -1b. This is the a β β first-line treatment for MS, and it works by suppressing T-helper cell response, reducing T-cell migration across the blood-brain barrier. It can be given intramuscular or subcutaneous. o Glatiramer acetate : is another first-line treatment for MS that is given subcutaneously. It helps block your immune system's attack on myelin causes alteration of T-cell activation and differentiation, and this medication is an
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