Greater depth but lou gehrig simply concedes what

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greater depth, but Lou Gehrig simply concedes what some of his listeners may thinkthat his bad break is a cause for discouragement or despair. Gehrig refutes this by saying that he has "an awful lot to live for!" Granted, he implies his conces-sion rather than stating it outright; but in addressing it at all, he acknowledges a contrasting way of viewing his situationthat is, a counterargument. Let's look at an example by Alice Waters, a famous chef, food activist, and author. Writing in the Nation, she argues for acknowledgment of the full conse-quences of what she calls "our national diet": from Slow Food Nation ALICE WA1 EltS So conditioned are we to believe that food should be almost free that even the rich, who pay a tinier fraction of their incomes for food than has ever been paid in human history, grumble at the price of an organic peacha peach grown for flavor and picked, perfectly ripe, by a local farmer who is taking care of the land and paying his workers a fair wage. And yet, as the writer and farmer David Mas Masumoto recently pointed out, pound for pound, peaches that good still cost less than Twinkies. When we claim that eating well is an elitist preoccupation, we create a smokescreen that obscures the fundamental role our food decisions have in shaping the world. The reason that eating well in this country costs more than eating poorly is that we have a set of agricultural policies that subsidize fast food and make fresh, whole-some foods, which receive no government support, seem expensive. Organic foods seem elitist only because industrial food is artificially cheap, with its real costs being charged to the public purse, the public health, and the environment. To develop a logical argument for better, healthier food for everyone, Waters refutes the counterargument that any food that is not "fast, cheap and easy" is "elitist." She does that by redefining terms such as "cheap," [eating] well,""expen-sive," and "cost." She explains in a step-by-step fashion the "smokescreen" of price that many people use to argue that mass-produced fast food is the best alternative for all but the very wealthy. She points out that "[o]rganic foods seem elitist only because industrial food is artzficially cheap" (emphasis added). Waters asks her readers to think more deeply about the relationships among availability, production, and distribution of food: she appeals to reason. • ACTIVITY •following is an excerpt from an article by George Will, a columnist for the Washington Post and Newsweek, entitled "King Coal: Reigning in China." Discuss how he appeals to logos in this article on "China's ravenous appetite for coal."
from King Coal: Reigning in China GEORGE WILL Half of the 6 billion tons of coal burned globally each year is burned in China. A spokesman for the Sierra Club, which in recent years has helped to block construction of 139 proposed coal-fired plants in America, says, "This is under-mining everything we've accomplished." America, say environmentalists, is exporting global warming. Can something really be exported if it supposedly affects the entire planet?

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