Invasive ductal carcinoma Invasive ductal carcinoma IDC is the most common type

Invasive ductal carcinoma invasive ductal carcinoma

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Invasive ductal carcinoma . Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is the most common type of breast cancer. This type of breast cancer begins in your breast’s milk ducts and then invades nearby tissue in the breast. Once the breast cancer has spread to the tissue outside your milk ducts, it can begin to spread to other nearby organs and tissue. Invasive lobular carcinoma. Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) first develops in your breast’s lobules and has invaded nearby tissue. Other, less common types of breast cancer include: Paget disease of the nipple . This type of breast cancer begins in the ducts of the nipple, but as it grows, it begins to affect the skin and areola of the nipple. Phyllodes tumour . This very rare type of breast cancer grows in the connective tissue of the breast. Most of these tumours are benign, but some are cancerous. Angiosarcoma . This is cancer that grows on the blood vessels or lymph vessels in the breast. The type of cancer you have determines your treatment options, as well as your likely long-term outcome. Learn more about types of breast cancer. Inflammatory breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare but aggressive type of breast cancer. IBC makes up only between 1 and 5 percent Trusted Source of all breast cancer cases. With this condition, cells block the lymph nodes near the breasts, so the lymph vessels in the breast can’t properly drain. Instead of creating a tumour, IBC causes your breast to swell, look red, and feel very warm. A cancerous breast may appear pitted and thick, like an orange peel. IBC can be very aggressive and can progress quickly. For this reason, it’s important to call your doctor right away if you notice any symptoms. Find out more about IBC and the symptoms it can cause. Triple-negative breast cancer Triple-negative breast cancer is another rare disease type, affecting only about 10 to 20 percent of people with breast cancer. To be diagnosed as triple-negative breast cancer, a tumour must have all three of the following characteristics: It lacks estrogen receptors. These are receptors on the cells that bind, or attach, to the hormone estrogen. If a tumour has estrogen receptors, estrogen can stimulate the cancer to grow. It lacks progesterone receptors. These receptors are cells that bind to the hormone progesterone. If a tumour has progesterone receptors, progesterone can stimulate the cancer to grow. It doesn’t have additional HER2 proteins on its surface. HER2 is a protein that fuels breast cancer growth. If a tumour meets these three criteria, it’s Labelle a triple-negative breast cancer. This type of breast cancer has a tendency to grow and spread more quickly than other types of breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancers are difficult to treat because hormonal therapy for breast cancer is not effective. Learn about treatments and survival rates for triple-negative breast cancer.
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  • Fall '18
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