Understanding Heart Failure 2017 Patient Education The clinical guidelines for

Understanding heart failure 2017 patient education

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In suspected heart failure, the ECHO is the final step of confirming the diagnosis. (Understanding Heart Failure, 2017) Patient Education: The clinical guidelines for patient education are recognizing symptoms, medication management and modifying lifestyle. The patient needs to have an understanding what heart disease is. They might not understand all the medical terms and need to be educated throughout the process. Someone without any knowledge and understanding of what heart failure is, the diagnosis can be a traumatic moment. It is important the individual has the support from their clinician and family.
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PATHOPHARMALOGICAL FOUNDATIONS 10 Teaching the patient and family of the signs and symptoms is of upmost importance. The individual is advised of the symptoms of the disease, such as dyspnea or shortness of breath, lightheadedness or dizziness, weight gain, lower extremity edema and fatigue. The individual needs to understand what is accepted as normal symptoms and know when those symptoms are progressing or advancing. They need to know when the symptoms require further interventions and if and when it’s an emergency situation. Educating the patient on managing their medications begins before the patient starts taking their initial dose. The individual needs to understand how their heart medications work, when to take them, what to avoid while taking them and what will happen if they are not compliant in taking their medications. They will be educated on the possibility of titrated dosing and complicated drug regimen. They will learn what to do if they miss a dose. The clinician or patient educator will advise them of how to refill their medications and what medications to avoid when taking their heart medications. Such as, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). Patient education on lifestyle modification is important for successful heart failure disease management along with medication compliance and symptom recognition. Lifestyle modifications that improve heart failure patient outcomes include smoking cessation, managing other chronic conditions, limiting salt intake and staying physically fit. By being physically active you can control weight gain, manage stress and prevent other chronic health diseases. Without these lifestyle modifications, heart failure patients risk a rapid decline, further complications and early death active. c. Compare Standard Practices
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PATHOPHARMALOGICAL FOUNDATIONS 11 Coronary heart disease, which reduces blood flow through the coronary arteries to the heart muscles, is responsible for about one in five deaths in Iowa. CHD affects men almost twice as often as women. CHD is age-related, increasing steadily every year for adults who are 65 or older. It is particularly common among men over 75. While CHD is common among older adults, it is not inevitable. Iowa’s CHD deaths have decreased 29 percent from 2003. In Black Hawk County they are trying to provide clear, culturally appropriate, timely and effective education, information and consultation about prevention, management and control of communicable diseases to the public and health care community.
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