It is located between the pharynx and the trachea the

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the vocal cords which produce vocal sound. It is located between the pharynx and the trachea. The larynx, also called the voice box, is a 2-inch-long, tube-shaped organ in the neck. We use the larynx when we breathe, talk, or swallow. Its outer wall of cartilage forms the area of the front of the neck referred to as the "Adams apple". The vocal cords, two bands of muscle, form a "V" inside the larynx. Each time we inhale (breathe in), air goes into our nose or mouth, then through the larynx, down the trachea, and into our lungs. When we exhale (breathe out), the air goes the other way. When we breathe, the vocal cords are relaxed, and air moves through the space between them without making any sound. When we talk, the vocal cords tighten up and move closer together. Air from the lungs is forced between them and makes them vibrate, producing the sound of our voice. The tongue, lips, and teeth form this sound into words. The esophagus, a tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach, is just behind the trachea and the larynx. The openings of the esophagus and the larynx are very close together in the throat. When we swallow, a flap called the epiglottis moves down over the larynx to keep food out of the windpipe.
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40 FIGURE 2.5 TRACHEA Trachea A tube-like portion of the breathing or "respiratory" tract that connects the "voice box" (larynx) with the bronchial parts of the lungs. Each time we inhale (breathe in), air goes into our nose or mouth, then through the larynx, down the trachea, and into our lungs. When we exhale (breathe out), the air goes out the other way. The esophagus, the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach, is just behind the trachea and the larynx. The openings of the esophagus and the larynx are very close together in the throat. When we swallow, a flap called the epiglottis moves down over the larynx to keep food out of the windpipe. The trachea is also called the windpipe, weasand (sometimes written wesand or wezand) or wesil. "Cut his weasand with thy knife." The Tempest, Shakespeare.
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41 FIGURE 2.6 BRONCHI Bronchi The trachea divides into left and right main (primary) bronchi. Each of which connects to a lung. The left main bronchus is more horizontal than the right main bronchus because of it is displaced by the heart. Foreign objects that enter the trachea usually lodge in the right main bronchus, because it is more vertical than the left main bronchus and threfore more in direct line with the trachea. The main bronchi extend from the trachea to the lungs. Like the trachea, the main bronchi are lined with pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium and are supported by C- shaped pieces of cartilage. The large air tubes leading from the trachea to the lungs that convey air to and from the lungs. The bronchi have cartilage as part of their supporting wall structure. The trachea divides to form the right and left main bronchi which, in turn, divide to form the lobar, segmental, and finally the subsegmental bronchi.
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