B f skinners claims about human character are

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B. F. Skinner’s claims about human character are creditable 14. Considering the honour by association argument involved and the premises it requires, the weakest point in the argument is ________. a) the premise that a person or group X is associated with another person or group Y b) the premise that Y has creditable beliefs or behaves in a creditable way 15. Considering the weakest point in the honour by association argument, the most effective way to argue against it would be argue that ________. a) Y does not have creditable beliefs or behaves in a way that is not creditable b) Y has questionable beliefs or behaves in a questionable way Main Review Question Criminal trials often come down to an evaluation of the character of the accused. Was he the sort of person who could commit murder? Was she the sort of person who could rob a bank? The job of lawyers on both sides is to argue that point: the prosecutor to show the accused is, the defense to show the accused is not. (They give other arguments too, of course.) Find an example of a criminal trial, real or fictional, and examine the ethotic arguments the lawyers make about the accused. Diagram them, evaluate them, and note which schemes are involved. Who makes their case? Did the judge side with the better arguments? Why or why not? If you are looking at a real trial, avoid actual transcripts unless you happen to enjoy reading such things. Books or articles about trials are usually good enough as sources. For fictional trials, books, films, and TV shows are good sources. For ideas on how to proceed, see pp. 308–309 for pro homine arguments, pp. 310–311 for ad populum arguments, pp. 312–317 for appeals to authority, pp. 318–320 for ad hominem arguments, pp. 322–323 for arguments against authority, pp. 324–325 for appeal to eye-witness testimony, and pp. 326–329 for guilt (honour) by association.
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