Either we click with our co workers and become

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please and thank you's, we are taught to emotionally tolerate co-workers and peers. Either we click with our co-workers and become friends or  we learn to deal with the ones we don't like in order to keep our job. Bringing in cookies or having pizza parties helps build a cohesion for those  who are willing to be open. Both options are something my unit has suggested to get rid of the awkwardness each month. Cookies and pizza  may help open up the "shy" crowd and allow a few co-workers to build friendships. However, success in a person and a business is in their heart and their vision. When a promotion is on the line the vast majority of all the work  you just did to build relationships within the members you supervise goes out the door. If employee A has the ambition to move up in a  company, he may sacrifice that relationship he had with another employee to get where he intends to be. Therefore, I believe we can learn to  respect a co-worker and have a working relationship, but if I didn't plan to connect with an employee on an emotional level, most likely that  "connection" won't last or isn't real.  Additionally, "emotionally intelligent" to a car salesman may mean hard selling a pushover, and soft selling a customer who is indecisive. A  salesman can tweak his emotional intelligence to cater to his client. Where as a psychologist dealing with a suicidal client must truly  be emotionally "in tune" with his client. Another reason it cannot be learned. A salesman can't sell a suicidal patient on living like a psychologist  can work him through his problems. And and psychologist cannot psychologically sell a car like a salesman can. We are driven by our current  emotional intelligence to pick a path that best suits us as individuals.  Do you believe that employees can learn/be trained to be more emotionally intelligent? Yes, I do believe that employees can learn to be more emotionally intelligent.  I think that by recognizing that emotional intelligence can  promote a more productive work environment, employees can allow themselves to open up to emotional improvement.  By recognizing that  more effective communication and sensitivity towards coworker's needs can cause positive changes in the workplace, both employees and  managers can drastically improve productivity.  I feel that if this concept is taken seriously by employees, and incentive is provided to pursue  improvement, emotional training could be very successful.  In business, sports, the military, and any other situation which requires teamwork,  communication and cohesiveness are vital to produce quality results Do you believe that employees can learn/be trained to be more emotionally intelligent?
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