These people became two distinct bodies or churches

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These people became two distinct bodies or churches,, and in regard of distance of place did congregate severallly; for they were of sundry towns and villages, son1e in Nottinghamshire, some of Lincolnshire, and some of Yorkshire, whe:re they border nearest together. In one of these churches (besides others of note) was Mr~ John SmithJ a man of able gifts,, and a good preacher, who afteiwards was chosen their ...................... pastor. But these aften,vards falUng into son1e errors in the Low Countries, there (for the n1ost part) buried themselves, and their names. p. 13 I p. 13:s I p. 14 I p. 134 I
But [n this other church (wh[ch n1ust be the subject of our discourse) besides other worthy men, was Mr. Richard C[yfton, a grave and revered preacher, ,vho by h[s pains and diligence had done much good, and under God had been a :means of the conversion of 1nany. And also that famous and worthy 1nan Mr. John Robinson,, who afterwards was their pastor for many years, tiU the Lord took. him away by death. Also Mr. Wi1l[mn Brewster a .reverent man, who afterwards. \Vas chosen an elder of the ............................................................................church and lived ,vith then1 UH old age. But after these things they ,could not long continue [n any peaceable condition, but ,vere hunted and persecuted on every side, so as their former afflictions were but as flea--bitings in comparison of these which now came upon them .. For some were taken and clapped up [n prison, others had their houses beset and watched night and day, and hardly escaped their hands; and the most were fain to fly and leave their houses and habitations, and the means of their UveUhood. Yet these and many other sharper things \Vhich aften,vard befeH them, were no other than they looked for,, and therefore v,,rere the better prepared to bear then1 by the assistance of God;s grace and spirit.. Yet seeing themselves thus molested, and that there was no hope of their cont[nuance there, by a ioint consent they resolved to go into the Low Countries, where they heard was freedom of reHgion For all men; as also how sun.dry from London, and other parts of the land, had been exiled and persecuted for the same cause, and were gone thither, and lived at An1sterdan1, and in other places of the land. So after they had continued together about a year, and kept their meetings every Sabbath [none place or other, exerci.sing the ,vorship of God amongst themselves,, notwithstanding all the diligence and malice of their adversaries, they see[ng they could no longer continue in that condition,, they resolved to get over into Holland as they could; which ,vas in the year 1607 and 1608.
....~ '' CHAPTER IV. SHOWING THE REASONS AND CAUSES OF THEIR REMOVAL After they had lived in this city about some eleven or twelve years (which is the more observable being the whole tin1e of that famous truce between that state and the Spaniards) and sundry of them were taken away by death, and many others began to be well stricken in years, the grave mistress Experience having taught them many things, those prudent governors with sundry of the sagest men1bers began both deeply

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