Homeland Security Progress and Remaining Work Appendix XIV Performance

Homeland security progress and remaining work

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Homeland Security Progress and Remaining Work
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Appendix XIV: Performance Measurement units and was unable to control the distribution of the Ready Campaign messages or measure whether the messages were changing the behavior of individuals. 4 We noted that by examining the feasibility of approaches to verify data on its community preparedness programs, FEMA would be better positioned to begin to explore why programs that no longer exist were disbanded and develop possible strategies for reconstituting local programs or developing new ones. Among other things, we recommended that FEMA examine the feasibility of developing various approaches for ensuring the accuracy of program data. In July 2011, FEMA reported taking additional action to strengthen its performance measures by, for example, implementing a priority goal focusing on ensuring resilience to disasters by strengthening disaster preparedness and response capabilities, and beginning in fiscal year 2010, requiring its offices to develop and report on activity-level (or operational level) performance measures to align to each of FEMA’s budget activity lines. These steps should help FEMA strengthen its performance measurement efforts. However, FEMA should continue to work toward implementing a comprehensive set of measures for assessing national preparedness capabilities. For additional information about this area, contact David Maurer at (202) 512-9627 or [email protected] GAO Contact 4 Citizen Corps is coordinated nationally by FEMA and is intended to help coordinate volunteer activities for, among other things, better preparing communities to respond to emergency situations. Citizen Corps programs build on the successful efforts that are in place in many communities around the country to prevent crime and respond to emergencies. Programs that started through local innovation are the foundation for Citizen Corps and this national approach to citizen participation in community safety. Page 166 GAO-11-881 Homeland Security Progress and Remaining Work
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Page 167 GAO-11-881 Appendix XV: Risk Management Risk management has been widely supported by the President and Congress as a management approach for homeland security. 1 According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), risk information is usually one of many factors—and typically not the sole factor—that departmental decision makers consider when deciding which strategy to pursue. We have previously reported that defining an acceptable, achievable (within constrained budgets) level of risk is imperative to address current and future threats, and on the need to make risk-informed decisions related to homeland security. Many have pointed out, as did the Gilmore and 9/11 Commissions, that the nation will never be completely safe and total security is an unachievable goal. 2 Within its sphere of responsibility, DHS cannot afford to protect everything against all possible threats. As a result, DHS must make choices about how to allocate its scarce
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