Myths after lincoln 334 35 donalds biography of

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Myths after Lincoln , 334-35. Donald’s biography of Herndon also has an excellent discussion of Ward Hill Lamon’s Life of Abraham Lincoln (1872), which drew from Herndon’s materials. For further discussions of the Ann Rutledge myth, see Basler, Lincoln Legend , 147-63; and J. G. Randall, Lincoln the President: From Bull Run to Gettysburg (paperback ed., New York, 1945), 321-42. Quotations “cause a squirm” and “Atheist! Atheist!” are from Lewis, Myths after Lincoln , 336, 303; the quotation “composite American ideal” from Donald, Lincoln Reconsidered , 163. For the background and historical context of Carl Sandburg’s Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years , see Herbert Mitgang (ed.), The Letters of Carl Sandburg (New York, 1968), 225-37; Alfred Harcourt, “Forty Years of 191
Friendship,” Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society , XLV (Winter, 1952), 395-97; North Callahan, Carl Sandburg: Lincoln of Our Literature (New York, 1970), 23, 75-95; and Alfred Haworth Jones, Roosevelt’s Image Brokers: Poets, Playwrights, and the Use of the Lincoln Symbol (Port Washington, N.Y., 1974), 7-37. I also benefited from Robert W. Johannsen’s unpublished paper “The Poet as Biographer: Carl Sandburg’s Prairie Years,” read at a symposium on Carl Sandburg as a Lincoln biographer, Jan. 21, 1978, at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill. The quotation “Like him” is from Callahan, Sandburg , 101; the quotation “both poets withall” from Sherman, “Carl Sandburg’s Lincoln,” New York Herald Tribune Books , Feb. 7, 1926. The best accounts of Whitman and Lincoln are in Justin Kaplan, Walt Whitman: A Life (New York, 1980), 28-30, 258-61, 271-72, 300-1, 308-9, and Kaplan’s unpublished paper “After Whitman,” which was also read at the Knox College symposium and which is excellent on the connection between Whitman and Sandburg. The quotation “only distinguished epic poet” is from Kaplan’s paper. For more on Whitman’s Lincoln, see Basler, Lincoln Legend , 267-71, and Daniel Aaron, The Unwritten War: American Writers and the Civil War (New York, 1973), 69-72. As for Sandburg’s own comments about his work, the quotation “In Lincoln” is from Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years (2 vols., New York, 1926), 1: viii; the quotation “take Lincoln away from the religious bigots” from Wayne Gard, “Carl Sandburg Interprets Young Lincoln,” The Literary Digest International Book Review , IV (Feb., 1926), 189; the quotation “felt as if in a trance” from Mitgang, Letters of Carl Sandburg , 255-56; the quotations “All-American” and “democracy can choose a man” from Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln: The War Years (4 vols., New York, 1939), 2: 332- 33. For the critical reaction to Sandburg’s Lincoln, see Johannsen, “The Poet as Biographer”; and Jones, Roosevelt’s Image Brokers , 51-62. The Ben é t quo- tation is from the Atlantic Monthly (Dec., 1939), 22; the Hill quotation from the Kansas City Star , Dec. 2, 1939; the Commager quotation from the Yale Review , XXIX (Winter, 1940), 374; the Sherwood quotation from the New York Times Book Review , Dec. 3, 1939. Another favorable appraisal is Ben- jamin P. Thomas, Portrait for Posterity (New Brunswick, N. J., 1947), 285- 310.

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