Cause growers and their business allies generally

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cause growers and their business allies generally accepted the sam peon image as their restrictionist adversaries, they could not conten that Mexicans possessed the character from which this country cou fashion acceptable citizens. Instead, employers tried to manipula the stereotype in such a way as to demonstrate that Mexicans woul not have a detrimental impact on American society. They argue that the Mexican's inborn traits made him a lesser racial menace than any other unskilled labor group. Because Mexicans were herently tractable, growers asserted, they minded their own bu ness, willingly separated themselves from whites, and caused f social problems. "They are a very docile people," said Congressm John Nance Garner of Texas, the future Vice President. "They be imposed on; the sheriff can go out and make them do anything That is the way they are."74 C. S. Brown, an Arizona cotton farme 71 House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, Hearings on West Hemisphere Immigration, 231-232; and Hearings on Immigration from Countri of the Western Hemisphere, 276. 72 Senate Committee on Immigration, Hearings on Restriction of Western Hem sphere Immigration, 26-30. 73 House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, Hearings on West Hemisphere Immigration, 228; Senate Committee on Immigration, Hearings on striction of Western Hemisphere Immigration, 45, 60; C. C. Teague, "A Stateme on Mexican Immigration," Saturday Evening Post, CC (March 10, 1928), 170. 74 House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, Hearings on Seasonal This content downloaded from 137.110.192.6 on Sat, 17 Sep 2016 19:20:52 UTC All use subject to
Perceptions of the Mexican Immigrant representing his state's Farm Bureau, testified that southwestern growers were naturally endowed with skill in the handling of Mexi- cans. Just as southerners were particularly adept at controlling blacks, so "we of the Southwest . . . know the Mexican; we know how to please him and how to get him to please us."75 To further bolster their position, employers contended that in the event Congress curtailed Mexican immigration, they would be compelled to turn to far more undesirable groups-blacks, Puerto Ricans, or Filipinos-to meet the Southwest's unskilled labor needs.76 "The American negro we all know," said Ralph Taylor, a grower spokesman. "Are we Americans, with a full knowledge of the very serious racial problems which he has brought to the South and other parts of America, willing deliberately to spread him over the rest of the country in ever increasing numbers?"77 The Puerto Rican represented a racial menace even more insidious than the Negro, according to George Clements, director of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce's agricultural department. "While they all have negro blood within their veins, the greater part of them are without those physical markings which can only protect society.

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