Protestants and catholics share the augustinian

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Protestants and Catholics share the Augustinian understanding of sin and grace, of symbol and church, andAnselm's emphasis on the substitutionary atonement as informing our theology of sacrifice. Westerntheologies of the Supper, including Reformation debates, are more informed by Aristotelian than Platonicresources, which predominate in the East. Eastern liturgy and understanding of sacrifice is more informedby Christ's resurrection and the role of the Holy Spirit, while Christ's saving death and legal categoriespredominate in the West.THE CATHOLIC FAITHCatholic understanding of itself as a church claims an unbroken heritage developed organically andfaithfully, with continual reform from apostolic times to the present. Therefore, understanding its teachingon the Lord's Supper will entail looking not only at the biblical tradition as enunciated by Paul (1 Cor 10-11), the Synoptics (Mt 26:26-28; Mk 14:22-26; Lk 22:14-23) and John (6). It will also require a carefulexploration of the interpretation of this biblical witness in the heritage of the church, especially asenunciated in the general councils, notably Lateran IV (1215), Trent (1545-1563) and Vatican II (1962-1965).4This teaching is conveniently summarized in the 1992 Catechism of the Catholic Church.5However, to understand the fullness of Catholic life, it is important also to look at Catholic liturgicallife and ritual (CCC §§1345-1361), personal piety of the Catholic people in its worldwide variety (CCC§§1370-1372, 1384-1397, 1402-1405), and the forty years of ecumenical dialogue to which the CatholicChurch has been committed (CCC §§1398-1401).6Like other Christians, Catholics use the language ofthanksgiving, the Eucharist, when speaking of the Lord's Supper in theological terms. In exploringCatholic Eucharistic understanding, a variety of perspectives like cosmic celebration, effective word of
God, memorial of the Paschal Mystery, covenant renewal, food for the journey and work of the HolySpirit-all these are important, as well as terms for Lord's Supper, Eucharist, active presence andsacramental sacrifice (SC7in Vatican II; CCC §§1328-1332, 1358-1365). Most popularly Catholics usethe term Mass from the closing mission-oriented blessing: Ite, missa est, "Go, you are sent" (CCC§§1328-1332).For those unfamiliar with the Catholic tradition in detail, the sixteenthcentury contentious issues-themode of Christ's presence in the sacrament and the relationship of the Lord's Supper to Christ's uniquesacrifice-are of most interest. However, to focus on the mode or presence, or to describe the Eucharistsolely as sacrifice, obscures its "inexhaustible richness." In the "Decree on the Most Holy Eucharist"(1551), the Council of Trent affirmed that in instituting this sacrament, Christ poured out, as it were, inthis sacrament the riches of his divine love for all persons, "causing His wonderful works to beremembered" (cf. Ps 111 [110]:4), and he wanted us when receiving it to celebrate his memory (cf. 1 Cor11:24) and to proclaim his death until he comes to judge the world (cf. 1 Cor 11:26). His will was that

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Term
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Eucharist, Catholic Christians

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