Question 11 0 out of 2 points the status of blacks

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Question 11 0 out of 2 points The status of blacks during World War II: Selected Answer: e. C and D Answers: a. strengthened somewhat after the Red Cross reversed its long-standing policy against mixing blood from whites and blacks in its blood banks. b.
changed dramatically, particularly in the South, after a federal antilynching law was finally passed. c. was not affected by Roosevelt’s denunciation of any race of people claiming the right to be “master” over another. d. in northeastern cities was not always improved, despite the promise of better economic opportunity through wartime jobs. e. C and D Question 12 2 out of 2 points The Good Neighbor Policy was extended primarily toward Canada to lend support in its efforts to aid Britain against German aggression.
Question 13 2 out of 2 points “D-Day” refers to the:
Allied invasion of the Soviet Union. c. Allied invasion of Japan. d. Allied invasion of Europe at Normandy. e. Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Question 14 2 out of 2 points When war broke out in Europe in 1939, the Soviet Union stood virtually alone in fighting Germany.
Question 15 2 out of 2 points During the war, for the first time in American history, married women outnumbered single women in the labor force. Selected Answer: True Answers: True False
Question 16 0 out of 2 points The 1943 Texas Caucasian Race–Equal Privileges resolution:
Question 17 2 out of 2 points Since the enemy (Germany and Japan) used racism, racism and nativism had been stripped of intellectual respectability in America, particularly with the publication of Ruth Benedict’s Races and Racism.

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