It has been known by researchers since 1930s that on average the first child of

It has been known by researchers since 1930s that on

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It has been known by researchers since 1930’s that on average the first child of every woman arrives at age 19 and the baby boom is at age 22.5 and we reach adulthood in twice more time than chimpanzees do. As anthropologist Barry Bogin of Loughborough University in Leicestershire, UK says, “Even though we are bit bigger than chimpanzees, we mature and reproduce a decade later and live 2 to 3 decades longer. “Therefore, we are unique mammals who pass through three main stages of life: infancy, juvenile years, and adolescence. After long years of excavations and research on skeletons which look just like ours, researcher have concluded that our ancestors have had much shorter childhood and have grown up and died much faster than we do. Christopher Dean of University College London concluded
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that “the australopithecines were more like living great apes in their pace of development than modern humans.” One of these hominid children called “Taung Child”, had its first permanent molar at the age of 3.5, says Dean while human children usually have their first permanent molar at age of 6. According to Steven Leigh of the University of Illinois, research results of Taung baby and a three-year-old Australopithecus afarensis girls from Dikika, Ethiopia illustrate that the slowing down of reproduction age occurred after the australopithecines. Their reproduction
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