At a walking pace there is a lot to look at

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At a walking pace, there is a lot to look at: Architecture Art Awnings and canopies Balconies Color Food Landscape Lighting Paving Signs Store windows Upper level windows Other people GUIDELINES Engage the other senses with sound and smells, sun and shade, and the feel of the sidewalk underfoot. Allow products or services to “spill-out” onto the sidewalk in visually engaging ways. Don’t over-coordinate. Established commercial districts let you know they’ve evolved over time. Too much good taste can be boring. —Diana Vreeland
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²³ U R B A N D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S 3. G U I D E L I N E S A L L D I S T R I C T S 3.a. SITE PLANNING 3.b. BUILDING DESIGN LDR DEFINITION: “Street. The term ‘street’ means a vehicular way whether called among other names street, highway, roadway, thoroughfare, parkway, road, avenue, boulevard, lane, or place.” BUT A street is a place in the city, too, not just cars passing through the residue between buildings.
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These regulations and guidelines are intended to counter the mindset that put the needs of the automobile first, leaving us with a familiar legacy of hostile non-places like this. Parking must not wag Gaines Street. D E S I G N R E V I E W D I S T R I C T S T a l l a h a s s e e - L e o n C o u n t y P l a n n i n g D e p a r t m e n t G A I N E S S T R E E T ²´ P arking is the tail that wags the building. “Vulgar as it may be to actually say it in public, and except for the unusual circumstance in which there is no required parking (definitely rare in North America)* urban design starts with parking. You may not want to believe it, but that is the cold hard reality. I was chatting with an architect. We were discussing a small condominium project. Very large buildings came up. I happened to ask him if he had worked on one. ‘Yes when I was a young associate at a big firm.’ ‘Oh, they must be exceedingly difficult to design.’ ‘No not really.’ ‘Really?’ ‘No it’s true. For one thing most of the work is done by the engineer and contractor who lay out the basic grid. The architect’s fundamental job is getting the cars onto and off the site. You can route people up ramps and stairs and so forth. But cars are much more difficult. There are consideration of grades and transitions and turning radii. The real design turns on parking.’ ‘Amazing!’ ‘No, look at it with this project, here. What’s the very first thing we did? Long before we even started to look at the apartment layouts? We looked at how we would get cars onto and off the site...and how we could arrange the parking layout. Only then did we look at the building itself. Parking is the tail that wags the building.’” —David Sucher, author, City Comforts: How to Build an Urban Village *FYI: There is no required parking in Tallahassee’s Downtown Zoning Districts: CCPD, DI, RO, and SCD. The City’s Parking Schedule “B” applies in the Gaines Street Design Review Districts. Schedule “B” requires fewer parking spaces than the more frequently used Schedule “A.” PARKING
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