Her keynote at the Canadian Teachers Federation Forum on First Nations M\u00e9ti and

Her keynote at the canadian teachers federation forum

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reconciled. Her keynote at the Canadian Teachers’ Federation Forum on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit education inspired me to learn more about her nation. According to Statistics Canada (ibid.), 73.1 percent of Inuit peoples live in their traditional territories of Inuit Nunangat, with the largest number living in Nunavut (see figure 2.4). Of the remaining 26.9 percent who live outside their territory, approximately 4 out of 10 live in urban centres (e.g., Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa-Gatineau, Yellowknife, St. John’s). The Inuktitut language is spoken by 83 percent of people living in Inuit Nunangat (Statistics Canada 2017a) and has several dialects that vary by region. The challenges facing the Inuit peoples range from climate change and housing to educational attainment. Following are some basic facts: The Inuit represent slightly less than 1 percent of the total Canadian population. Just over one-third (35.6 percent) of Inuit aged 25 to 64 have some type of post-secondary qualification (university degree – 5.1 percent; university certificate – 1.7 percent; college diploma – 15.6 percent; trades certificate – 13.2 percent). Inuit who live outside their traditional territories have a higher rate of post-secondary education than those living in traditional territories. Two-fifths (41 percent) of Inuit aged 25 to 64 have a high-school diploma.
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25 Chapter 2. Indigenous Peoples of Canada I highly recommend the following organizations as a starting point for learning from the Inuit themselves: Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, – national voice of Canada’s 60 000 Inuit Inuit Broadcasting Corporation, – award-winning television programming for Inuit Inuit Women of Canada, – national organization of Inuit women Inuit Art Foundation, – non-profit organization supporting Inuit work Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada, – international voice on protecting Inuit way of life Figure 2.4. Inuit Communities in Canada An interactive version of this map can be found at <;. WHAT I KNOW ABOUT THE MÉTIS On April 14, 2016, history was made when Métis people and non-status Indigenous peoples were ruled to be “Indians” by the Supreme Court of Canada (see figure 2.5). This ruling meant that Métis and non-status peoples, at long last, could hold the federal government accountable for their rights and treaty claims (as already established with First Nation and Inuit peoples).
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26 Truth and Reconciliation in Canadian Schools I have had the honour of knowing Métis people all my life. My father, Nelson Toulouse, has a long-standing friendship with Tony Belcourt, the founding president of the Métis Nation of Ontario, and my husband, Luc Watier, is also Métis. What always stands out for me about the Métis is their deep sense of kinship, history, and dedication to change. One of my own role models is Senator Thelma Villeneuve Chalifoux, who was the first Métis woman to be appointed to the Senate (among many other firsts). She raised seven children on her own and represents
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