their prescribed gender role but not necessarily desiring to alter their natal

Their prescribed gender role but not necessarily

This preview shows page 6 - 7 out of 30 pages.

their prescribed gender role but not necessarily desiring to alter their natal sex Gender dysphoria Distress caused by discrepancy between one’s gender identity and natal sex Transsexual A person whose gender identity differs from their natal sex and may medically alter their sex to live life as their identified gender by using hormonal therapy and possibly sex reassignment surgery MTF: Male to Female transsexual (aka Transwoman) A natal male whose gender identity is female and presents socially as a woman often after medical intervention FTM: Female to Male transsexual (aka Transman) A natal female whose gender identity is male and presents socially as a man often after medical intervention Passing When someone is perceived as the gender they are presenting in their manner and dress Getting Read/Clocked/ Spooked When a stranger sees through the gender someone is trying to portray Stealth When a transgender person has transitioned into a different gender and lives as if born that gender Intersex A person born with genitalia that are neither exclusively male nor female or that are inconsistent with chromosomal sex Androgyne Someone whose gender identity is both female and male, or neither Cross-dresser A person who dresses in clothing not associated with their natal sex, but may not want to change gender Barriers to Health Care Transgender patients face multiple barriers to quality health care many of which were identified in the recent National Transgender Discrimination Survey collected from 6,450 self- identified transgender and gender-nonconforming people around the United States. These barriers include: 1. Social stigma – 25% have experienced some form of harassment in the medical setting. o Up to 71% hide their gender identity so as to avoid discrimination. o CHALLENGE: How best to identify transgender patients so as to properly educate regarding their breast cancer risk which may be elevated due to higher levels of smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, and nulliparity as well as long duration of exogenous hormone use. 2. Lack of provider knowledge and training - 50% transgender respondents worked with health care providers who lacked o knowledge of their health care needs. CHALLENGE: How to best educate providers about transgender patients and their specific health needs 3. Health insurance coverage – Majority are uninsured due to higher levels of unemployment, poverty, o and inability to access coverage through life partners and spouses. Those with insurance often have policies that do not cover routine o screening procedures or sex reassignment treatments. CHALLENGE: How to effectively change health care insurance coverage for this population so as to better address specific health needs 4. Structural layout of physician practices – Lack of comfortable space for natal men and transgendered men to wait for o breast imaging studies.
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  • Winter '17
  • Radiology, Magnetic resonance imaging, Medical imaging, Axial CT

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