Collaboration with ngos when sector nature of

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Collaboration with NGOs (when? sector? nature of partnership?). Public consultation and information (policy impact of NGOs). Coordination (role for governments in coordinating NGO activities). Official support (government funding, official contracts). 3.6.1 A Healthy State-NGO Relationship A healthy relationship is only conceivable when both parties share common objectives. If the government's commitment to poverty reduction is weak, NGOs will find dialogue and collaboration frustrating or even counter-productive. Likewise, repressive governments will be wary of NGOs which represent the poor or victimized. In such situations, NGOs will probably prefer to chart their own course, giving all instruments of the state a wide a berth as possible. Where the government has a positive social agenda (or even where individual ministries do) and where NGOs are effective there is the potential for a strong, collaborative relationship. As Tandon (1991) clarifies, this does not mean the sub-contracting of placid NGOs, but a "genuine partnership between NGOs and the government to work on a problem facing the country or a region based on mutual respect, acceptance of autonomy, independence, and pluralism of NGO opinions and positions."
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However, as Tandon points out, such relations are rare, even when the conditions are met. The mutual distrust and jealousy appears to be deep- rooted. Government fear that NGOs erode their political power or even threaten national security (Fowler 1992). And NGOs mistrust the motivation of the government and its officials. Though controversial and risky, many of the more strategic NGOs are overcoming their inhibitions and are seeking closer collaboration with governments (Fernandez 1987, Tandon 1991, ANGOC 1988, Garilao 1987, Aga Khan Foundation 1988). In this way, NGOs believe they will be better able to achieve the impact described above, and they will be able to expose the government to a grass-roots perspective which might otherwise be neglected. However, with closer collaboration comes increased risk of corruption, reduced independence, and financial dependency. 'The planning of projects and policies can be strongly influenced by inviting NGO leaders to serve on government commissions or by holding public consultations in which grassroots organization are able to voice their concern and experience. As Bratton (1990) commented: "Once the question was 'How can development agencies reach the poor majority?', now it is 'How can the poor majority reach the makers of public policy?" 3.6.2 Barriers to a Healthy State-NGO Relationship The following, identified by a range of commentators, are the major factors which impair the relationship between governments and NGOs (see especially Fowler
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1988 and 1992, Salamon and Anheier 1991 and 1992, Bratton 1988, Clark 1991, Edwards 1991, Tendler 1982, Tandon 1987, 1991 and 1992, Brown 1988, Elliott 1987, and Brodhead and Herbert-Copley 1988).
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  • Fall '15
  • PROFESSOROKWIRI
  • Government, The Land, Civil society, Non-governmental organization, Nongovernmental Organizations

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