Social learningbased and family system therapy

This preview shows page 12 - 13 out of 36 pages.

social learning–based, and family system therapy.Mounting literature supports the effectiveness of cognitive–behavioral approaches in enhancingsocial problem-solving skills and regulating impulsive behavior, reducing rates of reoffenseamong juvenile offenders (Andrews et al., 1990;Dowden & Andrews, 2003;Gendreau &Ross, 1979;Larson, 1990;Lipsey & Wilson, 1998;Redondo, Sanchez-Meca, & Garrido,1999). Redondo and colleagues found that CBT programs, in general, produced a mean reductionin recidivism rates among treated juvenile offenders of 25%. Moreover, this effect resulted in a50% reduction for treated offenders who received programs optimally configured to include themost effective components (i.e., those that included anger management and interpersonaleffectiveness as targets). Interestingly, treatment programs that included victim impact andbehavior modification components were found to be less effective. Furthermore, CBT-basedapproaches appeared to be most effective with higher-risk juvenile offenders, directlycontradicting clinical lore suggesting that high-risk offenders are untreatable (Landenberger &Lipsey, 2005).Similarly, a significant body of literature supports the use of more holistic family systemapproaches (Kazdin, 1987;Shadish et al., 1993), particularly MST (Borduin, 1999;Henggeler,1996;Schoenwald, Ward, Henggeler, Pickrel, & Patel, 1996). MST has been demonstrated toproduce both short-term and long-term reductions in recidivism among juvenile offenders,including persistent and seriously violent ones (Borduin et al., 1995). More specifically, it wasfound that 14 months after referral for MST services, juvenile offenders had been rearrested 50%fewer times than their treatment-as-usual counterparts (Henggeler, Melton, & Smith, 1992).Furthermore, MST-treated juvenile offenders had an overall reincarceration rate of 20%,compared with 68% for their treatment-as-usual counterparts. Finally, treatment effectiveness hasbeen maintained for follow-up periods of up to 4 years, with MST-treated juvenile offendersbeing arrested at much lower rates than the offenders who received treatment as usual; whenrearrest did occur, the MST-treated offenders committed significantly less serious crimes(Borduin et al., 1995).Risk ManagementAs with treatment of all offenders, treatment of juvenile offenders should be viewed as anongoing, dynamic process following the RNR paradigm. That is, intensity of treatment should bematched to the perceived risk of the juvenile offender, and criminogenic factors should betargeted for treatment, with the assumption that they may change as the juvenile develops(Borum & Verhaagen, 2006). Furthermore, only empirically supported treatments should beimplemented, treatment should be customized to suit the unique capabilities and characteristicsof the individual juvenile offender and his or her environment, and both treatment providers andcommunity supervision agents should continually monitor, reassess, and modify interventionprograms to ensure that treatment gains are maintained.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 36 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
Vallerie Williamson
Tags
Test, The Land, Sex offender

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture