America still has no current laws that limit power plants from emitting

America still has no current laws that limit power

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too late and the world will be too far affected to even try to reverse its effects. America still has no current laws that limit power plants from emitting greenhouse gasses. There are laws that limit the amount of sulfur, arsenic, and mercury that can be in the water we drink, but there is not the same for the amount of carbon in the air we breathe. Once the fight to help reverse the effects of climate change things like America’s and the world’s economy will not be drastically affected. Since the economy is something that will take the most hits right behind the environment itself due to climate change. Americans need to start caring more about fighting for laws that will help change climate change. Charging companies for emitting gasses into the atmosphere will be the first step that Americans need to see to try and save the planet. Americans need to stop waiting for climate change to personally effect their lives and need to fight before everyone feels the impacts of it. If we wait until the next generation to do the work we need to do now, there will not be much hope for the economy or the environment in the future. We need to do this to keep the planet in a good enough shape for the generations that will live here after us.
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Hadley 14 Sources: 1. Jon, Powers. "Climate Change Is the 'Mother of All Risks' to National Security." <i>Time</i>. Time, 6 Nov. 2015. Web. 7 Nov. 2015. 2. Glasmeier, Diana Liverman, Amy. "What Are the Economic Consequences of Climate Change?" <i>The Atlantic</i>. Atlantic Media Company, 22 Apr. 2014. Web. 5 Nov. 2015. 3. Foster, John Bellamy, Brett Clark, and Richard York. "The Midas Effect: A Critique of Climate Change Economics." <i>Development and Change</i> 40.6 (2009): 1085-097. Web. 4. Ruhl, J. B. "The Political Economy of Climate Change Winners." <i>Minnesota Law Review</i> 97.1 (n.d.): 206-77. Web. 5. Medellín-Azuara, Josué, Richard E. Howitt, Duncan J. Macewan, and Jay R. Lund. "Economic Impacts of Climate-related Changes to California Agriculture." <i>Climatic Change</i> 109.S1 (2011): 387-405. Web. 7 Nov. 2015. 6. Obama, Barack. "President Obama's Plan to Fight Climate Change." <i>The White House</i>. The White House, n.d. Web. 5 Nov. 2015. 7. Nordhaus, William. "What Will Climate Change Do to the Economy?" Yale Insights. N.p., 21 Aug. 2014. Web. 7 Nov. 2015.
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Hadley 15 8. Walsh, Bryan. "Why Seeing Is Believing—Usually—When It Comes to Climate Change." <i>Time Magazine</i> 02 Dec. 2012: n. pag. Web. 9. Worland, Justin. "Climate Change Could Drive More Than 100 Million Into Poverty by 2030, Report Says." <i>Time Magazine</i> 08 Nov. 2015: n. pag. Web. 10. Tol, Richard S. J. "The Economic Effects of Climate Change." N.p., Spring 2009. Web. 05 Dec. 2015. 11. "The Latest: Obama, Rousseff Call Targets Conclusion of Talks." <i>The New York Times</i>. The New York Times, 06 Dec. 2015. Web. 07 Dec. 2015. 12. "China Pollution: First Ever Red Alert in Effect in Beijing - BBC News." <i>BBC News</i>. BBC, 07 Dec. 2015. Web. 07 Dec. 2015.
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