Kumalos doubts do not infringe on his faithfulness or

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Kumalo’s doubts do not infringe on his faithfulness or prove that he is finished with his faith, but it shows a humanistic side to him that this significant instance of fear, as a result of his experiences, extracts. Furthermore, Kumalo begins to accept that Absalom’s situation is no fault
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Mathew 4 of his own. “There was nothing that he could remember, nothing, nothing at all, in all the years when his son was a boy, that could make it possible for him to do such a terrible thing. (Paton 45)” The inexplicable leads Kumalo to realize that South Africa’s systematic oppression is to blame for Absalom’s actions, the first instance in which Kumalo recognizes this problem. This allows him to take some weight off of his shoulders and will urge him to make a change in his own country to prevent more situations like Absalom’s. The final aspect of Kumalo’s character development is letting go of fear. Fear of the city, fear of conflict, and fear of the changing future. “‘And God, my son… forgive him his evil (Paton 83).’” As Kumalo prays this, he follows the words of Father Vincent and proves that sorrow is better than fear (Paton 51); Kumalo is now free to ’” Paton further resolves Kumalo’s inner conflict, and the story as a whole, in an artful way: he writes Kumalo’s trek up the rugged mountaintop, a symbol of poverty and destruction, as a scene full of reverence and reflection. He uses figurative language such as, “the sun touches the top of the mountains (Paton 93),” and repetition of the phrase “the light will come there (Paton 93)” to emphasize the vastness of his experiences and their far-reaching implications. Paton foreshadows change and hints that Kumalo is, and always will be, an agent for change among the South African people because of what he has experienced. Just like Kumalo, societal change is furthered by those with valuable experiences. These experiences create passion and the fervor that one began to see in Kumalo towards the end of the story. Paton masterfully crafts this theme through Kumalo’s character development and proves that those who learn from their experiences will cause the most change in their societies.
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Mathew 5
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