MSL101L07 Profession of Arms SR.pdf

Voluntary entry oath of service aspiring professiona

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Voluntary Entry Oath of Service Aspiring Professiona l Army Retirees & Veterans of Honorable Service Serving Professional End of official service Progressive Certifications Initial Certification Member of Army Profession Training, Education, Evaluations, Promotions, Assignments
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22
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23 THE ARMY PROFESSION ATTRIBUTES AND COMPETENCIES FOR ARMY PROFESSIONALS ADP 6-22 Army Leadership Requirements Model is one of the many available mechanisms the Army uses to develop and certify its members. The individual attributes and competencies of the Army Professional must reflect, enable, and sustain the essential characteristics of the Army Profession. Building on the sound doctrine it has had for decades for leader development, the Leadership Requirements Model (LRM) in ADP 6-22 contains the attributes and competencies for individual Army Leaders and Professionals. This modified LRM is to be inspirational and aspirational to all members of the Army Profession, while at the same time stating the Army’s expectations of its leaders and professionals. It is understood that members of the profession, both military and civilian, are not necessarily required to meet the attributes and competencies comprehensively, maximally, and outright. Attainment is commensurate with position and responsibility, but all members must possess a personal desire to continuously develop and ultimately meet the requirements of these attributes and competencies. “We need to re-focus, making sure that we are building the bench of leaders that we need for the next 20 years. That’s really our investment... the Soldiers we assess today, we’ve got a plan to get them to sergeants major. The development of those individuals has to come in not only operational assignments, but also institutional, education, and self development. We’ve got to focus on their futures.” Raymond F. Chandler III Sergeant Major of the Army
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Our Ethic The Army Ethic is the evolving set of laws, values, and beliefs deeply embedded within the core of the profession’s culture. The internalized Army Ethic guides the ethical conduct of the Army and its members in the defense of and service to the Nation. Although the Army Ethic has not been fully codified, the five most accepted foundations of the Army Ethic are: i The role of the United States and the purpose of the U.S. Army. The Nation’s legitimate right to sovereignty is the first moral basis for the Army Ethic. i The role of civil-military relations in the United States. The Army willingly serves subordinate to the authority of civilian government and is granted significant autonomy for its professional role. i The nature of the Army Ethic. As the Army moves forward into future conflict, it will continue to rely on an all-volunteer-force. The framework of the Army Ethic must provide a consistent theory of military ethics that grounds the martial virtues in more general moral concepts, lessening any gap between the Army, and the society it serves.
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