An electronic billboard that greets you by name asks if you enjoyed breakfast

An electronic billboard that greets you by name asks

This preview shows page 14 - 17 out of 36 pages.

An electronic billboard that greets you by name, asks if you enjoyed breakfast and shows an advertisement for your favorite cereal 22% 78% A taxi company that buys your geo- location data so it can automatically offer you a cab ride when you get off the train 37% 63% Online retailers that offer savings, speed, convenience, product range and delivery — but sell your data to third parties 18% 82% You email a friend about a planned Paris visit; online the next day, you notice advertisements for hotels, restaurants and excursions in Paris 32% 68% Smartphone and tablet apps used for navigation, chat and news that can access your contacts, photos and browsing history 16% 84%
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© 2017 KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”). KPMG International provides no client services and is a Swiss entity with which the independent member firms of the KPMG network are affiliated. A telematics device that enables emergency services to track your vehicle 22% 78% A free tablet PC if you let a tech company track when, why and how you use it 48% 52% Smart energy meters that allow your provider to deduce how many people live in your home, when you eat and sleep, and the appliances you use 43% 57% A new television that comes with a discount if you allow your viewing habits to be monitored 46% 54% Allowing your emails, text messages and browsing history to be collected to help law enforcement agencies prevent terrorism 49% 51% A telematics device that reduces your insurance costs, but gives your insurer the right to inform the police if you drive dangerously 45% 55% 15 Crossing the line
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Beware the backlash : Consumers will want their cut Every day, consumers agree to give organizations their personal data in return for free communication, instant knowledge, unlimited entertainment and unparalleled convenience. As long as the consumer feels they are receiving a fair deal, the agreement holds. But what would happen if a signi fi cant section of consumers, say those w ho fi nd use of their personal data creepy, began to feel they were being shortchanged? Or became more aware of the extent to which their personal data was being used? The growing adoption of anonymous browsing, ad blocking and cookie deletion are early indicators that this is an increasingly important issue for many people. The survey revealed that 60 percent of consumers globally already delete cookies on their internet browser and 52 percent manage their social media privacy settings. When looking a t fi gures by country, India was the most likely overall to manage social media privacy settings and regularly change usernames and passwords to protect personal information. Respondents from Japan, in contrast, were least likely to take precautions to protect personal information. As awareness around privacy issues grows, businesses risk a backlash when consumers realize the kind of money being made through the trading of their personal data.
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  • Fall '19
  • Privacy law, KPMG International, KPMG International Cooperative

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