To assess wongels usage of comprehension strategies i

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To assess Wongel’s usage of comprehension strategies, I provided her with two texts on animal training. One book was an informational text, and depicted the day to day roles of a zookeeper. The 2nd text was a narrative text about a student who takes a class trip to the zoo and is chosen to feed the monkeys. I chose these texts due to her desire to become a dolphin trainer. I found the content relatable. I wanted books of various genres to determine if Wongel consistentlyapplies the same strategies when interacting with text. Before instructing her to begin reading. She asked if she could flip through the book and view the pictures. The cover page only
10contained the tittle “Zoologist” and a close up photo of an Elephant. She struggled to infer what the text was about. According to Reutzel and Cooter (2016), Complex texts do not give up their information easily; consequently, they often require close reading to understand the author’s intended ideas and the organization of those ideas (p. 374). I allowed her to take a picture walk independently, while looking at the pictures, in the first text, she asked the meaning of the word “stall” and “sun visor.” She also read over the comprehension questions on the back cover of the text. To understand and appreciate a story, children need to know more than the definitions of words in the story; they need to have a frame of reference so they can make sense of the plot” (SEDL, 2013). It was evident that she was anticipating reading the text and wanted to ensure she could read and understand the words in the text prior to reading the story. As she read the narrative text, I noticed her rereading sentences that did not make sense to her, as well as circlingkeywords like the names of characters and words she did not understand. I did not allow her to view the text prior to reading. Sentence structure and vocabulary usage make informational text more complex and challenging to read (Reutzel & Cooter, 2016); therefore, I provided the opportunity with the first text.Wongel modeled the use of making inferences, vocabulary acquisition, and close reading strategies such as rereading to make sense of the text. She also demonstrated previewing comprehension questions before reading, to ensure she comprehended the text and was not merely focused on understanding the words on the page. Questioning is one of the most used andeffective instructional strategies for developing student comprehension. Some believe questioning should follow a structure or framework to have diagnostic value, while others argue comprehension is a constructivist process that builds interconnected schema structures in the brain, so questioning should probe for student understanding of connections in text (Reutzel &
11Cooter, 2016). I can use Bloom’s Question stems to take Wongel from a low literal comprehension level, to a more advanced and sophisticated inferential level, where the questionsare of a higher order. Understanding question-answer relationships (QAR), also helps students develop comprehension skills and is an excellent comprehension instructional strategy. Another

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