Howard Zinn considers businessmen like Andrew Carnegie and John D Rockefeller

Howard zinn considers businessmen like andrew

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Howard Zinn considers businessmen like Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller as “robber barons” for their means of acquiring wealth through ruthless or unethical methods. Once setting up his Standard Oil Company of Ohio in 1870, Rockefeller arranged secret agreements with railroads to ship his oil with them if they provided him rebates, or discounts on their prices. By doing so, he drove competitors out of business, as they were unable to meet his efficiency. Furthermore, Zinn explains how Carnegie amassed his grand fortune. By working 200,000 men twelve hours a day for wages that barely kept their families alive, Carnegie continued to retain money and add to his wealth. On the other hand, Schweikart and Allen refer to these industrialists as “titans of industry.” In other words, their means of successfully operating a business contributed positively to the United States as a whole. Through greater efficiencies in production, Carnegie and Rockefeller were able to obtain inexpensive steel and oil while driving costs down. In turn, with falling prices came greater sales. Carnegie reduced the price of steel from $160 a ton for rails in 1875 to $17 a ton by 1898. As a result, Carnegie Steel saw its capital rise from $20 million to $45 million from 1888 to 1898. In addition, by 1897, at the peak of Rockefeller’s dominance over the oil industry, prices for refined oil reached their lowest levels in the history of the petroleum industry. These entrepreneur’s obsession with low costs sparked immense sales, which provided the foundation for America’s rapid economic surge. What do the authors say about Nixon’s resignation? How do they characterize the end to his presidency? What is the larger significance of this view? Howard Zinn considers businessmen like Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller as “robber barons” for their means of acquiring wealth through ruthless or unethical methods. Once setting up his Standard Oil Company of Ohio in 1870, Rockefeller arranged secret agreements with railroads to ship his oil with them if they provided him rebates, or discounts on their prices. By doing so, he drove competitors out of business, as they were unable to meet his efficiency. Furthermore, Zinn explains how Carnegie amassed his grand fortune. By working 200,000 men twelve hours a day for wages that barely kept their families alive, Carnegie continued to retain money and add to his wealth. On the other hand, Schweikart and Allen refer to these industrialists as “titans of industry.” In other words, their means of successfully operating a business contributed positively to the United States as a
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whole. Through greater efficiencies in production, Carnegie and Rockefeller were able to obtain inexpensive steel and oil while driving costs down. In turn, with falling prices came greater sales. Carnegie reduced the price of steel from $160 a ton for rails in 1875 to $17 a ton by 1898. As a result, Carnegie Steel saw its capital rise from $20 million to $45 million from 1888 to 1898. In addition, by 1897, at the peak
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