When he wakes back at his cell Reverend Hammond Biggers pastor from his church

When he wakes back at his cell reverend hammond

This preview shows page 6 - 9 out of 9 pages.

When he wakes back at his cell, Reverend Hammond, Bigger’s pastor from his church visits him
Dunne 7 in his cell, preaching of hope and faith and love beyond life, leaving Bigger with a cross to wear around his neck. Jan enters Bigger’s cells and tells him that he is not angry that he murdered the love of his life, but rather wants to help him. Jan knows that black people have endured much worse than him and he wants to help with Bigger’s case, free of charge. This is the first time in Bigger’s life that he sees a white person as an individual human being, rather than part of the large, white authority. Jan introduces Bigger to Boris A. Max, a lawyer for the Labor Defenders, who is on Bigger and Jan’s side. The state attorney, Buckley, then enters the cell with Mr. and Mrs. Dalton, wanting Bigger to reveal the name of his nonexistent accomplice, resulting in an argument between Buckley and Max. Bigger’s family and friends now enter the crowded cell, only worsening his feeling of guilt. He asks his mother to forget him, but his mother begs the Daltons not to kill her son or evict her from their apartment, but they respond that they have no control over the former. Afterwards, all the visitors leave the cell, except Buckley remains and pressures Bigger to confess to a definite confession about killing Mary and Bessie, who the police know about, as well as other unsolved rapes and murders. Bigger confesses to the murders but writes nothing to explain them, because he realizes it would mean explaining his whole life. Buckley leaves the cell with a racist comment about Bigger’s inferiority as a black man, and Bigger, feeling empty and alone, falls to the floor sobbing. Bigger is escorted by authorities to the courtroom for the inquest, where Mrs. Dalton testifies that the earring found is a family heirloom that she had given to Mary. Jan comes to the stand next, where the coroner exaggerates questions about the Communist Party. Mr. Dalton takes the stand following Jan, where Max asks him about black housing, as he is the landlord of a vast majority of buildings in the South Side. Max questions Mr. Dalton of unfair rent taxes and black tenants, as well as hinting how both may have contributed to the death of his daughter. The
Dunne 8 coroner exhibits Bessie’s body to the jurors and find that Bigger should be convicted for both rape and murder; they are using Bessie’s body only as property to give the death penalty, proving that Bessie’s death is unequal to Mary’s, simply because Bessie is black, not white. Bigger feels that Hammond betrayed him, giving him false hope, so he rips off his cross and throws it across the floor. He vows to never trust anyone again. Max visits Bigger once again in his cell trying to get Bigger to trust him after trial. He finally tells Max what really happened that night and his emotions towards the case, even towards the African American world. This is the first time we glimpse into Bigger’s mind and his genuine and pure reactions towards that night. He explains how he has always been separated from people on the other side of an imaginary line, who do not care about his poverty, shame, and woes. He feels he was and will always be forbidden from

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture